Feature

Who Will Mourn the Tech Bro?

The subculture you love to hate is tough to define. It will be even tougher when it’s gone.

09/24/2019 By James Ross Gardner Illustrations by Ryan Snook

Feature

In the Straits: An Inmate Turned Millionaire Turned Lone Survivor

He was a convicted felon who found a niche in Seattle’s construction boom. Then a fatal boating accident came for Michael Powers’s fairy-tale ending.

08/19/2019 By James Ross Gardner

Feature

A Song of Shadow and Light

The Tacoma Refugee Choir formed to reach out to the most vulnerable. Its founder didn't anticipate its impact on her—or her city.

05/28/2019 By James Ross Gardner Photography by Lindsey Wasson

Feature

Where on Earth Is Sam Sayers?

On a perfect summer day, a solo hiker went missing from a Cascade trail. Nine months later, the mystery has consumed the lives of thousands.

04/23/2019 By Allison Williams

Feature

Dealer Takes All: Inside One of Seattle's Biggest Opioid Busts

It took a multistate sting to bring down the opioid king of Capitol Hill. But not before his product stole a life.

03/26/2019 By Levi Pulkkinen

Feature

Land of Milk and Money: Inside the Wild World of Washington Dairy

Death, disfigurement, sexual harassment allegations, and a years-long labor dispute worthy of a Hollywood blockbuster.

02/26/2019 By Stefan Milne Photography by Mike Kane

Year in Review

Seattle Met's 6 Most-Read Stories of 2018

From an unclaimed Seattle rock star to a world-changing card game, these were our most poplar long-form articles of the year.

12/19/2018 By Seattle Met Staff

Feature

Women Erased: How Washington Has Failed Missing Native Women

More Native American women have been counted as missing or murdered here than almost anywhere in the country. But authorities are at a loss on how to track, let alone stop, the trend.

12/18/2018 By Hayat Norimine Photography by Lindsey Wasson

Feature

The Sainthood of Dave Matthews Has Been Indefinitely Postponed

He’s one of the highest grossing musicians alive. So why won’t Seattle claim its biggest rock star?

11/20/2018 By Allison Williams

Feature

A Rumor in Madrona

Can a decades-old deadly home invasion case help unmask the dangers of the misinformation age?

10/15/2018 By James Ross Gardner

Born This Way

Conversion Therapy Survivors Still Have Wounds to Heal

Licensed therapists can no longer practice conversion therapy on minors. But new legislation can't erase the anguish of those who lived through the experience.

06/19/2018 By Hayat Norimine

Feature

The Boat at the Bottom of the Sea

More than a year after a Seattle-based crabber vanished in Alaska's Bering Sea, its final hours remain a mystery. The surviving family of the Destination’s crew—and one intrepid investigator—seek to uncover the secrets the ocean still keeps.

04/09/2018 By Eva Holland

Feature

Darren Berg on the Run: Inside the Biggest Ponzi Scheme in Washington State History

He owned yachts and sped around the country in Lear jets—spoils from the more than $100 million he bilked from investors—before he was convicted and sent away to serve an 18-year sentence in federal prison. Then, late last year, Darren Berg disappeared.

03/19/2018 By Ciara O'Rourke

Feature

Rape Survivors in Washington State Run Against a Ticking Clock

Most people sexually assaulted in ­Washington state have just three years to pursue criminal charges against their ­assailant. A bill to remove the statute of limitations would change that. Until then, survivors who seek justice are racing against time.

01/17/2018 By Hayat Norimine

Best of Seattle Met

Seattle Met's 6 Most-Read Stories of 2017

From avalanches to growing up Muslim in rural Washington to the surprising origins of a mall-food mainstay, these were our most popular long-form articles of 2017.

12/19/2017 By Seattle Met Staff

Feature

Spell Casters, a ‘Magic: The Gathering’ Origin Story

A Boeing employee and a mathematician dreamed up a new kind of collectible card game in a Seattle parking lot 25 years ago. They couldn’t have known Magic: The Gathering would change the gaming world forever.

12/18/2017 By Darren Davis

Feature

How 'Real Change' Changes Lives

Some 300 people take to the Seattle streets and suburbs to sell 'Real Change,' the weekly homelessness, poverty, and social justice newspaper. They endure wet weather, indifference, and rejection—lots of rejection. Here’s why they still press on.

11/20/2017 By Brooke Jarvis

Feature

The Russian Spies Who Fooled Seattle

Before hackers tried to sway the 2016 election or word spread that our new president might be compromised, a peculiar couple resided on Seattle’s Capitol Hill. Have we really taken stock of the spies who lived among us?

10/30/2017 By James Ross Gardner

Feature

Scents from a Mall: The Sticky, Untold Story of Cinnabon

Three decades after its creation in Seattle, the cinnamon roll purveyor maintains a novel sway over our appetites and, thanks to a certain flamboyant, corrupt attorney, some unexpected TV fame.

10/23/2017 By Allecia Vermillion Photography by Kyle Johnson

Profile

Is Consensus Gone After Tim Burgess?

Over the past decade, Tim Burgess has clashed and collaborated with colleagues and as a council member left fingerprints on some of the city’s most important legislation. But mostly he has been a consensus builder. What happens when he’s gone?

09/19/2017 By Hayat Norimine