Article

Lay Down Tracks (or) Boost the Buses?

Trolley backers claim more streetcars will convert transit haters and spur development. But buses are cheaper, and Seattleites are already flocking to them.

01/03/2009 By Eric Scigliano

Article

Regarding Tess

When Tess Gallagher, the widow of acclaimed Northwest writer Raymond Carver, planned to publish early drafts of her late husband’s beloved short stories, the outcry from the New York publishing establishment was loud and rancorous. What was she thinking?

01/03/2009 By Claire Dederer

Article

Greener Oil (or) Bio Folly?

Washington politicians, energy mavens, and drivers are jumping on the biodiesel bandwagon. But skeptics warn that it steals desperately needed food crops and may actually raise greenhouse emissions.

12/28/2008 By Manny Frishberg

Article

Legal Eaglets

For five years, the UW Environmental Law Clinic has defended the little guy, battled big corporations, and given sheltered students real-world experience. Now its benefactor is thinking of pulling the plug.

12/28/2008 By Daniel Jack Chasan

Article

Open Election (or) Partisan Ploy?

A proposed voting reform is supposed to protect independent voters by banning political parties from county ballots. But opponents fear it will only protect endangered Republican officeholders.

12/28/2008 By Lee Fehrenbacher

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Lord of the Reins

There was a time, not so long ago, when horse racing was dead in Washington State. There was a time when the career of Emerald Downs’ top jockey, Ricky Frazier, was dead too. Hell, there was a time when Ricky Frazier was nearly dead. A story of courage, c

12/27/2008 By James Ross Gardner

Article

Shades of Green

Greg Nickels’s Climate Action Plan brought him global glory as “America’s green mayor.” But is it civic transformation or eco-opportunism? We crunch the carbon counts, probe the mayor’s environmental conversion, and suggest some ways to make Seattle clean

12/27/2008 By Bruce Barcott

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Walking Town (or) Pedestrian Peril?

City hall is trying to stop crosswalk carnage and make Seattle safe for pedestrians, but sometimes its strategy seems to be forcing them off the street.

12/27/2008 By Sarah Anderson

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Man of Many Acts

Bumbershoot booker Chris Porter tries to catch the trends, keep it Reel, and always have a backup when Devo bails for China.

12/27/2008 By Kevin Friedman

Unnecessary Study of the Month

Nature is Good

12/27/2008 By Christopher Werner

Article

Can Jake Locker Save Husky Football?

The University of Washington hasn’t had a winning football season in six years, and the last great squad is known more for its criminal activity than for its wins. This season, as fans and alumni clamor for the dismissal of the legendary coach hired to pu

12/27/2008 By Roger Brooks

Article

Ctrl Alt Delete

From Lakeside School computer geek to pioneer Microsoft programmer to the gay community’s biggest benefactor, Ric Weiland seemed to have it all: brains, looks, wealth, social conscience. Then, on a sunny Pride weekend, he took his own life.

12/23/2008 By Kevin Phinney

Article

The Olympic Oil Patch

Hundreds have tried to strike black gold in Washington. And they’re not done yet.

12/20/2008 By Eric Scigliano

OPEN LETTER

When Headlines Attack

12/20/2008

Article

Worst. Holiday. Ever.

We give an unloved occasion an overhaul.

12/20/2008 By Matthew Halverson

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What Lies Beneath

12/20/2008

Article

Northwest College Rankings 2008

Included: Video coverage of how to find the college that best suits you, courtesy q13fox.com

12/19/2008 By Matthew Halverson and Stefan Durham With Megan Clark and Jessica Campbell

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Class Hysteria

College is a balancing act.

12/18/2008 By Matthew Halverson

Article

Fast-Lane Reform (or) Highway Hogwash?

Tim Eyman claims his latest ballot measure will open empty lanes, cure congestion, and fulfill a state audit’s recommendations. Critics contend it will have the opposite effect—and will set back transit, too.

12/18/2008 By Manny Frishberg