Your one-stop shop for today's local campaign news, gossip, and analysis. 

• The Downtown Seattle Association, which endorsed Seattle Prop. 1 ($60 car tabs for transportation upgrades) last week, announced today that it  alos supports the $231 million Families and Education Levy, and opposes Tim Eyman's anti-tolling, anti-light-rail Initiative 1125.

(1125 would require the state legislature, not the nonpartisan Transportation Commission, to set tolls; would restrict the use of tolls to pay only for the roads on which they're levied; and would prohibit construction of light rail on I-90.)

The DSA also released scorecards ranking elected officials and candidates on how well their positions align with the business group's positions on downtown issues, including the tunnel, downtown transit service, additional police foot patrols downtown, downtown density, and mandatory sick leave.

In general, incumbents in this year's races fared best, with one exception: Challenger Bobby Forch slightly out-ranked incumbent Jean Godden, thanks to his support for advertising at transit shelters (on her DSA questionnaire, Godden was ambivalent about selling ad space at transit shelters). Among those running this year, the business group ranked Tim Burgess highest overall.

Not surprisingly, among current elected officials, Mayor Mike McGinn ranked lowest in the DSA's rankings, thanks to his opposition to the deep-bore tunnel, his support for higher parking rates downtown, and his opposition to Tim Burgess' aggressive panhandling ordinance, which McGinn vetoed.[pullquote]"My goal is  to bring the political conversation toward the middle 80 percent of the folks who are reasonable, and for [whom] politics is not a zero sum game, but a legitimate tool by which  to manage our social contract," Charles says.[/pullquote]

• Crocodile Cafe owner Marcus Charles filled us in today on some of the details of his new PAC, the Progressive Conservative Coalition, which we wrote about last week.

Charles says he decided to form the group because he was frustrated by a political conversation dominated by the far left and the far right. "My goal is  to bring the political conversation toward the middle 80 percent of the folks who are reasonable, and for [whom] politics is not a zero sum game, but a legitimate tool by which  to manage our social contract," Charles says.

• Jessie Israel, the King County employee who ran unsuccessfully against city council member Nick Licata in 2009, is holding a fundraiser next month for her "friend and mentor," Jean Godden. The invitation for the October 13 event credits Godden with everything from creating more bike trails and transit to "opening up the waterfront" to increasing the number of food trucks in Seattle.

Israel's support gives some credence to the latest (wild) rumor: That Godden plans to retire mid-term (that is, in 2013) and that Israel---who reportedly planned to run for Godden's seat if she didn't seek reelection this year---will seek the appointment.

• Darshan Rauniyar, a Bothell Democrat running in the back of the crowded field to replace US Rep. Jay Inslee, announced today that he's raised $110,000. It's unclear, however, who the money is from---the Federal Election Commission's campaign database does not show any contributions to Rauniyar's campaign.