OOBT

1. City attorney Pete Holmes wants more pot shops in Seattle once recreational marijuana becomes legal next year, the Seattle Times reports. According to the Times' official pot correspondent, Bob Young, Holmes has asked the city to increase the number of licenses for recreational pot stores from 21 to some larger number (Holmes doesn't say exactly how many he would like to see) on the grounds that 21 weed outlets won't be enough to meet the demand for legal pot in Seattle. 

“We ask that the [Washington State Liquor Control] Board carefully monitor supply and demand for recreational marijuana as soon as the licensed dispensers begin sales and consider issuing additional licenses later in 2014 for dispensers in Seattle if the 21 initial licenses are insufficient to meet demand in our city,” Holmes wrote this week.

21 weed outlets won't be enough to meet the demand for legal pot in Seattle. 

2. Seattle Bike Blog has the news that in addition to firing chief lobbyist Evan Manvel, new we had earlier this week, the Cascade Bicycle Club's new director, Elizabeth Kiker, has also laid off communications director M.J. Kelly.

The group has gone through a number of major staff turnovers and is poised for more: Half the group's board of directors is up for reelection next Tuesday.  

4. Capitol Hill Seattle has more on last night's mayoral candidate forum at Barboza, which I tweeted about last night (and which we Fizzed about this morning).

Both candidates—state Sen. Ed Murray (D-43, Capitol Hill) and incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn, agreed that Capitol Hill needs more "proactive" policing—police presence that doesn't rely on reports of violations so that police can responsd to  complaints and 911 calls. "We need more cops," Murray said. McGinn said that the city had added more beat cops and park rangers to deal with downtown violence and street disorder.

One detail we didn't get: Between the two candidates' signature drinks—the McGinn and Tonic (gin and tonic) and the GingerED (ginger ale and whiskey), Capitol Hill resident Murray's drink dominated, with 65 percent of drinkers buying the Murray concoction to McGinn's 27 percent (we'll chalk the eight-percent discrepancy up to boozy miscalculation). 

5. In another odd effort to turn one of Seattle's former daily papers, the PI.com, into the Catholic Daily Reporter, reporter Joel Connelly expends some 650 words on a poll of the United States' Catholics, which concluded that most of them "agree with the pontiff"—i.e., the Pope—that the church has been too focused on homosexuality and abortion.

We're eagerly looking forward to hearing what the PI.com's Protestant, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, and atheist bureau chiefs have to say about gay rights and reproductive choice.

 

 

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