1. The weekly mayor's race fundraising reports are in and state Sen. Ed Murray continues to outraise incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn. This week, Murray brought it $33,908 to McGinn's $8,317 (overall, Murray is about $200,000 ahead of McGinn—around $530,000 to $330,000).

The average contribution to both candidates is roughly the same, about $220; Murray simply has more contributors than McGinn, about 1,000 more. 

2. Given yesterday's messy story (McGinn's camp questioned Murray's commitment to racial equality), one notable McGinn contributor is State Rep. Hans Dunshee (D-44, Snohomish). Dunshee sponsored the same 1998 proposal that McGinn's camp is now trying to use against Murray—a class-based alternative to affirmative action rules that Dunshee pushed at the time. (Murray actually supported a competing traditional affirmative action plan, but McGinn's camp says that behind the scenes, Murray supported Dunshee's plan; we talked to Dunshee yesterday, and he doesn't corroborate Team McGinn's story.)

Fizz has to wonder if former state Rep. Velma Veloria approved of McGinn's affiliation with the unorthodox Dunshee.

Dunshee hosted a fundraiser for McGinn last week, contributing $100 to McGinn.

Fizz has to wonder if former state Rep. Velma Veloria—the McGinn supporter who criticized Murray yesterday for secretly favoring Dunshee's plan—approved of McGinn's affiliation with the unorthodox Dunshee, the sponsor of the very initiative Murray is supposedly guilty of backing.

Meanwhile: notable Murray contributor? Former City Attorney Mark Sidran's wife Anais Winant gave $100 to Murray. As we've noted before: Murray supported the once-controversial Sidran for mayor in 2001.

3. The group set up to oppose increasing the minimum wage for hospitality and transportation workers in SeaTac (site of the airport) is funded largely by the conservative Building Industry Association of Washington, as well as the city’s more mainstream Chamber of Commerce, political constant Don Stark, and Alaska Airlines.

According to reports filed with the state Public Disclosure Commission, the anti-minimum-wage group Common Sense SeaTac, has paid Allied Communications Strategies, a company that has also done work for a number of arch-conservative organizations.
 
4. The new head of the Cascade Bicycle Club, Elizabeth Kiker, wasted no time in firing PR director Evan Manvel yesterday—another shakeup in a long list of upheavals at the state’s largest bike advocacy and ride promotion organization.

Kiker told Fizz she’s looking for someone to be a strong advocate for biking; her popular predecessor, Chuck Ayers, was a vocal proponent of the idea that the bike club should be focused on advocacy, not just the recreational bike rides that bring in most of the group’s money.