1. The mayoral candidates' fundraising numbers are in for May and while state Sen. Ed Murray (D-43, Capitol Hill) raised the most money, you have to put an asterisk by his number because—thanks to the fundraising freeze he's under while the legislature is in session—his impressive $100,000 take during the two-week break between the regular session and the special session represents to some extent a four month download of pent up contributors. Some other Murray asterisks: He spent the most in May, nearly $60,000 (he did a poll) and he's under the fundraising freeze again ... and the way things are going in Olympia, he'll probably be barred from fundraising for at least another few weeks.

One more asterisk for Murray, though a good one ... a group of supporters started an independent political committee last week to raise money for his campaign.

Meanwhile, City Council member Bruce Harrell, who'd been raising around $30,000 a month, raised a whopping $70,000 in May—and he only spent $16,000. 

The other main candidates also outdid themselves: Incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn, who'd been posting meh numbers ($11,000 in February) to okay numbers ($28,000 in April) raised a solid $47,000 in May with an unexpected take from business types; and former City Council member Peter Steinbrueck raised $36,000 in May, easily his biggest haul, having never cracked $20,000 in any previous month.

The most important number at this point, is how much cash on hand the candidates have. McGinn is way out in front on that score. He's got $126,000 cash on hand.

McGinn has raised the most overall ($227,000 to Murray's $224,000 to Harrell's $183,000 to Steinbrueck's $98,000). But the most important number at this point—with ballots going out in about a month—is how much cash on hand the candidates have to get their name and message out.

McGinn is way out in front on that score. He's got $126,000 cash on hand. Harrell is next with $106,000. Murray is at $85,000. And Steinbrueck is at $48,000.

McGinn's frugal spending is curious though. His reports show no spending for a campaign manager nor a fundraiser. Essentailly, McGinn doesn't seem to have a paid campaign staff.

2. In some more good news for Harrell, the City Council unanimously passed his signature social justice legislation yesterday that prevents employers from discriminating against job applicants by automatically disqualifying someone with a criminal record.

“The data resoundingly confirms when employment rates increase, crime decreases," Harrell said in a statement. "This is a means to reduce recidivism and make our streets and Seattle safer. The legislation is important in making our local economy work for everyone, removing barriers to accessing jobs and creating a pathway for re-entry and success.”

McGinn's frugal spending is curious though. His reports show no spending for a campaign manager nor a fundraiser. Essentailly, McGinn doesn't seem to have a paid campaign staff.

The data also shows why Harrell's bill was on-point social justice legislation. His victorious press release noted:

According to the University of Washington’s Law, Society and Justice Program, approximately 409,000 people in King County have criminal convictions. While African Americans are 3.6 percent of Washington’s population, they account for nearly 19 percent of the state’s prison population. Meanwhile, 92 percent of all employers run background checks on some or all candidates. In 2010, the white unemployment rate was 8.8 percent in Seattle, but the African American unemployment rate was 15.7 percent.

3. Meanwhile, in some bad news for Murray, Fizz hears the special session in Olympia is set to start at noon on Wednesday (today's the last day of the first special session—our coverage of the last-minute political maneuvering is here.)

That doesn't give Murray much time to dial for dollars.

4. Also in the runup to the next special session in Olympia: Senate-side transportation committee co-chair, Republican Sen. Curtis King (R-14, Yakima), released his transportation funding package yesterday. Democratic house transportation committee chair Rep. Judy Clibborn (D-41, Mercer Island) has an $8.4 billion package on the table.

Keep in mind the state has a court order to fund $2.8 billion culverts by 2030—the McCleary of fish!— and Sen. King's package only funds $20 million for culverts by 2023.

Here's a compare and contrast on some main points:

Clibborn: .10 cents gas tax over 12 years for $8.4 billion. King: .10-and-a-half cents gas tax over 10 years for $8.4 billion

Clibborn: $420 million for transit and $370 million for bikes and peds. King: Zero for transit and zero for bikes and peds.

Clibborn: $450 million for the Columbia River Crossing (to match Oregon's contirbution and get federal matching funds. King: Zero for the CRC. King says he doesn't like the light rail component of the CRC project.

Clibborn: A local option for transit funding to be approved by county voters—a permanent 1.5 percent MVET increase, split between transit and roads funding (King County, which is advocating for the local option, is facing a 17 percent cut in service as temporary local option money passed by the King County County Council in 2011 is set to expire next year.) King: A temporary 0.3 percent sales tax increase to be approved by voters and sunsetting in 2018.

Two other notes: You'll remember that the Republicans made fun of Rep. Clibborn's proposal after the I-5 bridge collapse (even though the GOP didn't even have a proposal yet) for not putting enough into maintenance and for putting too much funding into stormwater.

Sen. King's proposal puts $1.2 billion into basic maintenance vs. Rep. Clibborn's $920 million, hardly a major upgrade out of his $8.4 billion package.

As for stormwater infrastructure and culverts, King followed the GOP line and only dedicated $40 million while Clibborn set aside $316 million. However, keep in mind the state has a court order to fund $2.8 billion for culverts by 2030—the McCleary of fish!—and King's package only funds $20 million for culverts by 2023.