What should I say?
Everyone is gay

—Kurt Cobain, Nirvana, "All Apologies," 1993

The pro-gay marriage campaign has raise more than $12 million to the opposition's $2.6 million. Corporate Washington has rallied around the gay marriage cause, including a high-profile $2.6 million donation from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and his wife Mackenzie. Microsoft, Steve Ballmer hismself, and Vulcan also kicked in big bucks.

However, another Seattle icon also kicked in—Sub Pop Records. They've kicked in a total of $56,200, including a check for $25,000 in the last week of the campaign.

This isn’t the first time Sub Pop backed up the gay rights movement; in 2009 they contributed $7,500 to Washington Families Standing Together—the group campaigning to uphold domestic partnership rights.

Sub Pop shows has no other history of political involvment in Washington politics.

We wanted to give the record label props for joining the fight.  We also wanted to know if Sub Pop Records is simply dipping its toe in the political pool before a big leap, or are they a one-issue kind of business. We asked Sub Pop executive Vice President Megan Jasper.

 What inspired Sub Pop to lend so much support to marriage equality and nothing else?

Jasper told PubliCola:

We see this as a civil rights issue and it’s something we care very much about. To have anyone in a position where he or she isn’t able to live their lives in a way that they choose and have to deal with unfairness seems brutal to us. [One of our founders] Jonathan Poneman always says this is the civil rights issue of our time. We contributed to the campaign because we had a little bit of money we could contribute and we felt like it was money well spent. But many of us have been out waving signs and we even released a single called “Same Love,” for support.

Quite honestly, five of us in this office got married this year, and I can’t imagine someone not getting to have the experience I just had a month ago. That’s not right.

We feel like this is something that needs to exist and it’s not fair that it doesn’t. If we’re still struggling with this as a city or a state we’ll continue to be vocal about it.

 Personally, I support I-502 (which would legalize recreational use of marijuana) but people are going to smoke one way or another and marriage is a totally different ball game. The fact that people are being kept from being able to marry someone they love—I resent that we even have to vote on that. We’re a company so it’s hard to endorse a candidate, if we were we’d hope we all felt the same way, but we all felt the same about same-sex marriage; we’re sensitive to people that are themselves. They shouldn’t feel bad because they’re a certain color or a sexual preference or for what god they choose to worship.

Quite honestly, five of us in this office got married this year. and I can’t imagine someone not getting to have the experience I just had a month ago. That’s not right.

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