Today's Loser: Tim Eyman

A new Elway Poll shows that support for Tim Eyman's latest initiative, I-1125, is slipping. In the past month support for the measure has dropped from 56-25 to 43-36, according to a poll of 407 random voters between October 19-20. (The poll has a five percent margin of error.)



I-1125 would regulate tolling in a number of ways: preventing variable tolls (different prices at different hours); preventing tolls from one road from paying for another; and putting tolling decisions into the political hands of the legislature. It would also foul up voter-approved light rail across I-90, the pet cause of 1125's one major funder, Bellevue developmer Kemper Freeman, who's put $1.2 million into the measure.[pullquote]It would also foul up voter-approved light rail across I-90, the pet cause of 1125's one major funder, Bellevue developmer Kemper Freeman, who's put $1.2 million into the measure.[/pullquote]

Last week's Cola ThinkTank took up 1125, featuring competing opinion pieces by sponsor Eyman and Microsoft, one of the many high-profile (and generally conservative) anti-1125 endorsers to come out in recent weeks. Others include: Republican gubernatorial candidate Washington State Attorney General Rob McKenna, Boeing, the Washington Roundtable, the Bellevue Downtown Association, the Seattle Downtown Association, and the Seattle Times.

Liberals—both blue and green— have also lined up against the measure, including: the Washington State Labor Council, SEIU, UFCW, the Boeing machinists,  the Washington Conservation Voters, the Sierra Club, the Poverty Action Network, and the Washington State Democrats.

The broad opposition has put the anti campaign at more than $2 million raised (in comparison to Eyman's $1.3 million, mostly from Freeman) with  recent big donations against 1125 coming in from the Mariners, Bank of America, Nintendo, AT&T, the International Union of Operating Engineers (from D.C.), and the local in Bothell.

See our analysis of I-1125 here.

Today's Second Loser: The City's Comprehensive Plan

The city council's budget committee appears poised to put off updating the comprehensive plan, the document that guides the city's development policies, due to the ongoing budget shortfall.

Although council member Mike O'Brien protested that the city's Department of Planning and Development should stay on its usual seven-year schedule for updating the comp plan so planners could coordinate that work with the city's climate action plan, other council members argued today that DPD had more important work on its plate and that putting the comp plan off for a year wouldn't represent much of a setback.
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