Morning Fizz

Damn Freeway

By Morning Fizz May 13, 2011



1. "Jay hasn’t taken a position on this because it isn’t a serious proposal. Jay is working on real issues like creating jobs and lowering health care costs, he does not have time for this nonsense."

—U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee (D-WA, 1) spokesman Robert Kellar on the Republican proposal, introduced yesterday, for a constitutional amendment that would allow the states (if two-thirds of them agree) to nullify federal law.

We asked all the members of the Washington delegation what they thought about the idea and didn't get many responses. Patrick Bell, spokesman for Washington State's star Republican, U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers' (R-WA, 5), told us McMorris Rodgers is still reviewing the bill and doesn't have a position yet.

2. "What did we see today?"[pullquote]For what it's worth, what everyone "saw today" was CLC give a questionable "Innovative Conservation Project Award" to the Washington Department of Transportation for an I-90 widening project.[/pullquote]

—Gene Duvernoy, President of the Cascade Land Conservancy at the end of yesterday morning's CLC awards breakfast, launching into a condescending summary of the preceding event as if he were a kindergarten teacher talking to his class (in this case the hundreds of local political folks at the convention center event, including the governor.)

For what it's worth, what everyone "saw today" was CLC give a questionable "Innovative Conservation Project Award" to the Washington Department of Transportation for an I-90 widening project, that has an elk ramp so wildlife can get over the freeway—or, as one skeptical attendee put it to Fizz: "damn freeway," criticizing the environmental group for cheering a highway project.

3. "Why did they arrest us, rather than talk to us?"

—UW student Morgan Currier, one of the 27 students arrested during Wednesday's sit-in protest at interim President Phyllis Wise's office, recounting what the group asked Wise yesterday at a follow up protest during the Board of Regents meeting. (Andrew will post a report on Thursday's follow-up confrontation later today.)

4. " Includes monetary and non-monetary contributions from Jan. 1, 2001-Dec. 31, 2010 to candidate campaign committees of legislators serving in the House and Senate on May 12, 2011."

—From a MapLight.org report on oil industry contributions to congress published yesterday as Democrats held a hearing to push legislation (that Republicans oppose) that would end $21 billion in industry subsidies and direct the money to deficit reduction.

The donations from the oil industry skew heavily in favor of Republicans. For example, 90 percent of Exxon Mobil's contributions and 85 percent of ConocoPhillips contributions went to GOP legislators.
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