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Letters to Seattle Met

August 19, 2011 Published in the September 2011 issue of Seattle Met

Dam Inspired

Thanks for this excellent review of the history of the Elwha dams (“The Elwha’s Last Dam Summer,” August 2011) and the struggle to remove them. It is interesting to compare this with the same struggle going on today along the Klamath River to remove four dams. The wonderful thing is how old adversaries, the tribes, fishermen, environmentalists, came together to make this happen. This coalition has put hope back into our future. Thanks to activist Mikal Jakubal, who painted the crack on the face of the dam, putting art in the service of river restoration.

Paul Richards
Oakland, California

• • •

Road Trip Reading

Loved the August issue. Especially the article about the Elwha Dam (“The Elwha’s Last Dam Summer”); read it out loud to my mom driving back from a night camping on Rialto.

@Ellenbringloe
via Twitter

• • •

Biotech Lesson

I cannot begin to tell you how much I enjoyed the article about pro-life biotechnologist Dr. Deisher (“The Crusade of Dr. Deisher,” August 2011). Thank you for presenting such a sensitive topic in an objective way that prompted me to think, reflect, and become more aware of current topics and local people of interest. Good work.

Esther Magnotti
Bellevue

• • •

Way Back When

I’m one of those who can say, “I knew Marcellus ‘when’ and we’re still long-­distance friends. (“Text Messenger: A Talk with Marcellus Turner, City Librarian, the Seattle Public Library,” August 2011) He worked at East Tennessee State University library in his second job as a librarian, and he was fantastic. We hated to see him leave. You’re fortunate to get MT, Seattle.

Carol Norris
via seattlemet.com

• • •

Shades of Bullying

Thank you for an article on an important subject (“The Bully Backlash,” August 2011). I’d just like to point out that the documentary Finding Kind never defined bullying, on purpose, since it dealt with girl culture in all its forms, and not just “systematic abuse.” It’s way more complicated than that. And I wanted to highlight the most interesting thing that happened in the scene you’re referencing; it wasn’t the pretty girl apologizing for inadvertently having caused the other ones pain or the other ones being angry because they felt bullied, rather it was the other girls apologizing to the pretty one because they had been mean to her simply because she was pretty.

And that’s the whole point of the movie. It’s not about pointing fingers and who’s the bully and who’s the victim, because they all are on both sides in some way. There was obviously an issue in that room, and just talking about it brought them closer, and unleashed a torrent of emotions. The “pretty one” even ends the segment by saying, “I’m so happy right now.” So talking about semantics seems sort of pointless. Should someone have told the girls, “Stop crying, suck it up, she is just a more powerful Alpha than you, so stop with this ‘toxic nice stuff’ and deal with it?” Of course not.

You even say this in your closing argument, regarding shades of gray and different social milieus, etc., so I’m just slightly confused about your point. It just might boil down to that I’m just not sure you picked the best example to illustrate it.

Tom
via seattlemet.com

• • •

At Your Own Risk

I’m over 50. I have an IQ of over 150. I am considered wealthy. So let’s just start by assuming that anyone who doesn’t wear a bike helmet might not fit your description (“No-Brainer,” June 2011). Perhaps you should ask folks like me why we prefer not to wear a helmet before disparaging them.

We all take risks. Statistically, it’s more dangerous for the author to ride in an automobile than to ride a bicycle. I’m a private pilot. You might argue that every time I go up, I’m an idiot. It’s not necessary that I fly, and if I lose an engine around here it will be hard to find a flat piece of property to land on. But it’s my life and my choice.

I’ve gotten this far now, haven’t I? Every day is a bonus from here on. It’s my call not yours, and I’m no idiot.

Mike Johnson
via seattlemet.com

• • •

Counting Crows

I remember going on a school field trip back in the 1960s to the Volunteer Park collection (“10 Must-See Masterpieces,” April 2011) and being stunned by the power of these Crow screens. They are five feet high and each one is almost 12 feet long. As an adult I’ve worked on making a digital graphic of them and was interested in the insight about the crow partially hidden by a rock. The shape of that crow always seemed odd to me but now it makes sense.

Kenny
Covington

• • •

Corrections

Though Ozette Lake did become part of Olympic National Park in 1953, Franklin Delano Roosevelt did not play a part, as our timeline of the park stated (“Insider’s Guide to Olympic National Park,” August 2011); he had died by 1945. And we miscredited a Dancing Til Dusk image (“On the Town”) to Mary Pritchard; Alexandra Notman is the photographer.

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snail mail to 1201 Western Ave, Ste 425, Seattle, Washington 98101. 
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