A King County ballot drop box

Hope they're not camera-shy.

Don't worry, you're not seeing double (or triple, or quadruple) on your Instagram feed. Yes, that many people took photos outside ballot drop boxes this weekend, casting their votes in the 2020 election. King County Elections reported that it had collected a whopping 60,000 ballots by Sunday night, or just four days after voting materials went out. In 2016, the county received 10,659 ballots within five days of mailing them (the county corrected a previous tweet saying 16,000).

It's a promising start if the county wants to reach its 90 percent voter turnout goal over the next two weeks. In 2016, the number dipped to 82 percent, three points lower than turnout in 2012. That's still well above the countrywide turnout of 61.4 percent in 2016, which is why it's nice to see that early voting hasn't just been a local phenomenon. The country has experienced a marked uptick in turnout at this juncture, especially among Democrats.

Hopefully other areas, however, have not had to deal with the mess King County Elections staffers cleaned up in West Seattle Junction on Saturday. It seems that someone attempted to slip feces into a ballot box. Ballots were fine, but selfie-takers had to watch their steps: "The team didn’t have materials with them to clean up the sidewalk—also, it’s a good night to thank an election worker!" King County Elections tweeted.

Good thing it rained yesterday. Anyway, if you're craving more info about drop boxes (did you know they weigh 1,000 pounds?) and the ballot collection process, the video below should answer many of your questions.