1. Typically we add some pointed context to our "On Other Blogs Today" reoports. We missed one opportunity yesterday, though. when we quoted state Rep. Jan Angel (R-26, Port Orchard) telling the Capitol Record that she was an "environmentalist." Rep. Angel, who's running for state senate in a pivotal special election that could tip the balance in Olympia, was reacting to the fact that California liberal environmentalist billionaire Tom Steyer is putting $300,000 into an independent expenditure against her. She said:

"I’m an environmentalist too, so this man doesn’t even know me. But he is putting all this money against me in this race.”

In the words of one environmental lobbyist: "God, it's harder to find bills where she has voted pro-environment than where she hasn't." 

Angel has an 11 percent lifetime voting record from the Washington Conservation Voters.

For example, she voted against banning coal tar sealants, she voted against a local complete streets grant program, she voted against banning phosphorus from fertilizers, she voted against funding for bus service, and she voted against banning toxic chemicals in kids' toys. Meanwhile, she sponsored bills to eliminate the requirement that sewers be provided inside urban growth areas, to eliminate vehicle mile reduction goals, to delay stormwater requirements, to restrict toll revenues to paying exclusively for roads, and to restrict state agnecies' ability to move forward with greenhouse gas regulations.

The green lobbyist concludes sarcastically: "But I mean, if she says she's an enviro, she probably is."

Meanwhile, she sponsored bills to eliminate the requirement that sewers be provided inside urban growth areas, to eliminate vehicle mile reduction goals, to delay stormwater requirements, to restrict toll revenues to just roads, and to restrict state agnecies' ability to move forward with greenhouse gas regulations.

2. Erica phoned in last night on her way home from the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce mayoral debate at Barboza to report:  A) The candidates were, gasp, congenial (and even agreed on something—the couch they were sitting on was uncomfortable); B) Both candidates were compelling (though, according to ECB's notes, they were both vague on how to fight crime in Capitol Hill); and C) it was a packed house (and, Erica noted, seemed to favor Capitol Hill state Sen. Ed Murray, no surprise.)

Check out her tweets here.

A couple of standouts:

 

A curious answer—from Murray—(which we'll follow up on today):

And whoa, Murray gets all Stonewall:

Final note on last night's debate: There was a list of three banned words—"progressive," "vibrant," and "parking" (which McGinn cleverly turned into "places to store cars.") Smart strategy, though we would have added a few more words to the list: "divisive," "establishment," and "felony"—if you know what we mean.

3. Speaking of which candidate the crowd favors: We made McGinn a winner in yesterday's Afternoon Jolt because after last week's Seattle Parks Foundation mayoral debate, the Parks Foundation published a survey showing that a whopping 55 percent of the audience liked McGinn's answers compared to the underwhelming 19 percent who liked Murray's.

However, there's certainly a germane follow-up question that we failed to consider (and the Parks Foundation failed to ask): Which candidate did you support heading into the evening's debate? We must say, considering all the shout-outs McGinn was making from the stage to city staffers in the audience that night, the survey sample may have been biased going in. 

(The leading employment category of Mayor McGinn's contributor base—despite 2009 candidate McGinn's righteous assertion that it was "not right" and "not fair" for the mayor to take city employee contributions because of the obvious intimidation factor—is city employees.)

4. Finally, for Friday's edition of Fizz: Sam Bellomio, the former Occupy activist and constant dissident during City Hall testimony time who's running against City Council member Sally Bagshaw, was formally banned from speaking at City Council meetings for two weeks by Council president Sally Clark for calling City Council member Tim Burgess a "dick."

Clark tells Fizz: "[Bellomio] said Burgess was 'being a dick.' I had warned him last time he used an epithet at a council member that the next time he'd get a two week break. He can still come into the building and chambers, just no public comment for two weeks."