On Other Blogs

On Other Blogs Today: Elections and Density

By Erica C. Barnett October 29, 2012

1. The Everett Herald profiles the increasingly "strident" 1st Congressional District race between Democrat Suzan DelBene and Republican John Koster.

Frankly, though, most of the stridency seems to be coming from Koster, who has accused DelBene (who is wealthy) of trying to buy her way into the job; posted photos of her home on his website; accused her of failing to require a Democratic donor to pay taxes on an airplane purchase when she was head of the state Department of Revenue; and trashed her for failing to vote in nine elections.

Larry Stickney spent three years trying to keep the names of those who signed R-71 petititons secret—in part because, he claimed, people were taking photos of his home. Now, his candidate John Koster is posting pictures of DelBene's home on his website.

2. Speaking of photos of DelBene's house: Pam's House Blend points out that Koster's campaign manager, former R-71 (anti-domestic partners' rights) campaign manager Larry Stickney, spent three years trying to keep the names of those who signed R-71 petititons secret—in part because, he claimed, people were taking photos of his home. 

Now, his candidate Koster is posting pictures of DelBene's home on his website.

3. Even before voters decide whether to fund a new, $290 million downtown Seattle seawall, the city's transportation department is seeking bids for the general construction contractor, the Puget Sound Business Journal reports. The proposal, which involves issuing bonds, requires 60 percent support to pass in November.

4. Alex Steffen, writing at CityTank, makes the case that density makes cities more affordable. Money quote: "As long as there is more demand than supply, prices rise. There is no way around that fundamental fact of capitalism. That means, if we wish to moderate housing prices to limit displacement of lower-income citizens, we have two options: reduce demand, or increase supply."

5. And in today's Presidential election roundup: 

As Hurricane Sandy nears the East Coast, the Hill has footage of Mitt Romney arguing for the elimination of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and saying disaster relief should be "sen[t] back to the private sector." 

The New York Times looks at the final, county-by-county battle for votes in the swing states.

And the New York Review of Books discusses the threat Romney would pose to civil rights—specifically, to the rights of low-income minorities in Southern states to vote.

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