1. Starting out in Auburn last week, protesters set out on foot for Olympia, where 30 of them—twice as many as when they started—will arrive today to demand that legislators close corporate tax breaks to help balance the budget. Dubbed "the People's Walk for Our Future," the protesters—labor leaders, religious leaders, and community members—have asked legislators to meet them on the capitol steps today at 11:30.

The crew continued their 50-mile walk this weekend, which legislators—in another confirmation that Olympia is gearing up for a special session to deal with the budget—took off. The session was originally scheduled to end Sunday, April 24.

[pullquote]The Oklahoma City Thunder won the first game of their playoff series last night, 107-103, after finishing the season 55-27, the 4th best in the West.[/pullquote]

2. In the wake of the city council's "Starbucks Day" proclamation earlier this month, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz will be at city hall today. (The Oklahoma City Thunder won the first game of their playoff series against Denver last night, 107-103, after finishing the season 55-27, the 4th seed in the West.)

3. Something the council won't be doing today: Voting on the Pioneer Square upzone, which they've been debating for months, and which was originally scheduled for this afternoon.

4. In today's Seattle Times,  transportation reporter Mike Lindblom  looks at the statement Mayor Mike McGinn's made on KUOW last week that the state's own numbers show the tunnel option causes more congestion than any other waterfront option, including the surface/transit option.

Lindblom disputed McGinn's conclusion.
We took a look at the same numbers, and the state does predict its tunnel plan would mean more car traffic in the area, which the anti-tunnel McGinn points to as more congestion. But the state's research also says drivers would reach their destinations sooner compared with the surface-transit option McGinn favors. Because of that, we find McGinn's statement half true.

The state — like many individual drivers — defines congestion as how slowly a vehicle moves, not as how many cars are on the road