BINGE WATCH MASTERY

Are you one of those people who spends more time browsing Netflix options than actually watching something? Stop it. Just watch Aziz Ansari's new Netflix Originals comedy series Master of None. The show, which arrived in one 10-episode lump of goodness last Friday, finds Ansari playing Dev, a character not to distant from himself. He's the son of Indian immigrants trying to deal with romance, race, arrested development, and family issues while trying to make it as an actor in New York City. The humor features the same blend of profane honesty and core warmheartedness as Ansari's standup and role as Tom Haverford on Parks and Recreation, but with a much less over-the-top, in-your-face vibe. It's also a case of cronyism gone right, as he cast his own parents as Dev's mother and father, and his dad Shoukath Ansari is hilarious. (Seattle bonus: Lynn Shelton directs two episodes and a Father John Misty concert plays a key role in another.)

RETURN TO THE WASTELAND

At long last, this week video gamers can return to the post-apocalyptic wasteland of the Fallout universe. For the uninitiated, the Fallout series takes place in an alternate reality where nuclear war wiped out most of civilization and left behind the radiated remnants of world filled with stylized 1950s Americana. In this setting, players are free to roam an open world and battle dangerous coalitions of survivors, super mutants, and other creatures. After the 2008 release of Fallout 3 (one of the greatest video games ever), fans finally get a numerical sequel on the latest generation of consoles when Fallout 4 hits stores tomorrow. The launch trailer for Fallout 4 (which is set in Boston) released last week and should induce anticipatory goosebumps for anyone who has played the series. (Now excuse me while I say my temporary goodbyes to my friends, family, and co-workers.)

GOOD TWEETS OF THE WEEK

These are good tweets, y'all...

A NIGHTMARISH BEDTIME TALE, PART II

Note to parents: If award winning novelist and screenwriter John Irving (The World According to Garp, The Cider House Rules) offers to read your children a story before they go to sleep, run in the other direction while screaming in terror. (Trust me, I hesitated putting one of these The Late Show bedtime stories in for the second straight week, but nothing made me laugh harder in the past seven days.)