We'll have the Top Gun Volleyball Scene, no, no—the Dad Jazz, please.

Image: Gwen Hughes

Genevieve St. Charles, also known by the pseudonym Goldsuit, has made her way back to the FoodArt Collection on Capitol Hill, where curator Jeremy Buben transforms his home into a gallery for food-and-drink-focused art.

Her newest show Froot—displayed for one of FoodArt’s December installments of the Capitol Hill Art Walk—features produce-inspired creations: Peach tables and banana coasters lay casually amongst Buben’s own inviting decor, while bananas made from neon or plywood line the walls; other plywood creations mix emoji-sexting culture with the Nokia flip-phone of bygone days. 

Banana emoji, banana emoji. Send.

Image: Gwen Hughes

St. Charles plays with twenty-first century connotations of fruitage and feels her medium lends itself to sensual subjects: “I wanted to play around with the sexy nature of fruit and start pushing the suggestiveness into my newest paintings and furniture pieces,” St. Charles explains. “The juicy textures and shapes of the fruits work beautifully with the gloss resin that I pour over all my paintings.”

But she barely needs the phallic “froot” to discuss dating and relationships. In her most popular project yet, paintings of LaCroix cans with kooky flavor names, labels like “Deleted Tinder,” “Gentle Stalking” and “Mutual Ghosting” indict generations of online daters for questionable behavior.

With the ever-beloved, on-trend elixir LaCroix as a mixer at Buben's bar, a 1970’s bow-chicka-wow-wow porno soundtrack pulsing from the stereo, and peeled bananas at every turn, this show turned a cozy Capitol Hill apartment into a sort of sexy neon-lit market stand. Eggplant emoji, eggplant emoji, OK hand sign, peach emoji—send.

You can check out Froot during FoodArt gallery hours now through January 2019.