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Image: Courtesy Bruce F Press / Wikicommons, photo illustration by Sara Marie D’Eugenio

The world’s most famous astrophysicist has unofficially appointed himself as premier scientific fact-checker for major motion pictures like Gravity, Interstellar, and Titanic. No film is safe. That passion becomes a live lecture when he heads to the Paramount with An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies. Here are a few other features that Tyson may hypothetically* debunk…

It’s A Wonderful Life

“In order to lasso the moon, you’d need over 245,000 miles of rope. That’s impractical. Additionally, there is zero scientific evidence that correlates the peal of bells to wing materialization.”

The Lion King

“Lions love feasting on warthogs and therefore would not dance through the jungle with one (and its meerkat pal), no matter what catchy Swahili phrase was uttered.”

Memento

“The narrative is presented backward, but backward time travel is only possible in the space around two black holes when they are about to collide.”

The Fault in Our Stars

“As an astrophysicist, I cannot stand for any more star shaming.”

Inside Out

“Emotions are actually the result of changes in neurochemicals in the limbic system of the brain and not personified creatures that sound like Amy Poehler and Lewis Black.”

The Muppets

“Frogs and pigs cannot talk.”

The Dark Knight

“Despite clearly taking place in the United States, there is no major metropolitan city called Gotham. I looked at a map.”

*Neil deGrasse Tyson never really said any of this

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Books & Talks, Film

Neil deGrasse Tyson: An Astrophysicist Goes to the Movies

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