Rent Report

Seattle-Area Rents Increase for Fourth Straight Month

May saw year-over-year price growth of as much as 22 percent.

By Seattle Met Staff June 6, 2022

Woodinville again tops the list of most expensive places to rent an apartment in the Seattle area.

There's good news and there's bad news, apartment dwellers.

First the good: The May 2022 data from Apartment List shows that median rents in the Seattle area aren't quite as eye-popping as the ones for this luxury apartment building. The bad news is that rents went up for the fourth straight month—in one suburb, as much as 22 percent year over year.

That's still not as bad as, say, New York City with its 29.5 percent year-over-year rent growth, but considering the historic inventory low and skyrocketing real estate prices, we get that it doesn't exactly feel like a win. Here are the nine most expensive cities in the greater Seattle area to rent an apartment in May 2022.

9. Seattle

Seattle's 14 percent year-over-year growth is a tad below the nationwide average of 15.3 percent. But median rents are still going up—in May, prices increased 1.8 percent compared to April.
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,616
Median two-bedroom rent: $1,953
Year-over-year rent growth: 14 percent

8. Renton

The median price of a one-bedroom Renton apartment in May 2021? $1,406. With the relatively steady growth since then, renters are now looking at an extra $250 per month.
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,657
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,099
Year-over-year rent growth: 17.9 percent

7. Mountlake Terrace

Although Mountlake Terrace landed in the seventh spot on this list, its month-over-month growth is a modest 0.6 percent, the smallest out of all the cities in the greater Seattle metro.
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,703
Median two-bedroom rent: $1,990
Year-over-year rent growth: 13.6 percent

6. Bothell

Redfin deemed several micro neighborhoods in this northern burb some of the most competitive for buyers looking to purchase real estate in 2021. With new bakery expansions and ongoing development, it's easy to see why rents here have jumped.
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,829
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,130
Year-over-year rent growth: 16.1 percent

5. Kirkland

It's the Eastside from here on out. Although Kirkland is the first city on our list with a one-bedroom rent that tops $2,000, it still only made it to the fifth spot.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,078
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,262
Year-over-year rent growth: 18 percent

4. Redmond

After a brief dip at the end of last year, Redmond is back as one of the most expensive cities for apartment renters in the Seattle area, with a 2.6 percent month-over-month growth.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,093
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,361
Year-over-year rent growth: 19.4 percent

3. Bellevue

A year ago, Bellevue renters could have lived there for Seattle prices. Now those numbers are drastically different, with the Eastside city showing a 3.6 percent month-over-month increase.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,136
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,383
Year-over-year rent growth: 22.4 percent

2. Issaquah

Recent updates to Apartment List's data collection and analysis methodology mean there's no median one-bedroom data available, but that two-bedroom price is very much there—and it's no joke.
Median one-bedroom rent: N/A
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,475
Year-over-year rent growth: 18.9 percent

1. Woodinville

You could rent a two-bedroom apartment in Seattle and maybe even a parking space for the cost of a Woodinville one-bedroom. The city has topped the list of most expensive places to rent in the Seattle area for the last several months. 
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,261
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,492
Year-over-year rent growth: 19.6 percent

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