Where did Issaquah land on this month's list?

You may have heard: Seattle is an expensive place to live. In recent years, the price to buy property has skyrocketed in the city and the suburbsMillennials have pretty much given up, and renters don't have it much easier.

In the latest Apartment List report, which includes data from April, the costs to rent an apartment in Seattle leapt by 16 percent compared to the same month last year. That year-over-year growth was up as much as 21.5 percent in Bellevue. Even Everett, one of the "most affordable" cities in the Seattle area, saw a 16 percent increase. Here's the top nine, based on the median cost for a one-bedroom.

9. Seattle

Compared to other cities in the greater metro area, Seattle is middle of the pack when it comes to year-over-year growth. That 16 percent is still nothing to sneeze at, but it is a bit more palatable when you consider the eye-popping numbers in cities like New York (31.8 percent), Phoenix (23.3 percent), and Austin (21.5 percent). Yay?
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,700
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,120
Year-over-year rent growth: 16 percent

8. Mountlake Terrace

It's neck and neck between Seattle and Mountlake Terrace, until you consider the month-to-month growth. April rents in Mountlake Terrace were up 1.5 percent compared to March; Seattle's were only up 0.9 percent. 
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,720
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,070
Year-over-year rent growth: 15.1 percent

7. Renton

Last year, broker Kim Colaprete named Renton as one of the most underrated locations in the area. Consider it underrated no more. Those median rents rose 2 percent month over month, and a staggering 18.8 percent compared to the same time last year.
Median one-bedroom rent: $1,750
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,290
Year-over-year rent growth: 18.8 percent

6. Bothell

The housing market in this northern suburb has continued its steady growth due to recent development and a stellar school district. The rental picture has matched that demand, with a one-bedroom median price in the $2,000 territory.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,000
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,290
Year-over-year rent growth: 15.3 percent

5. Issaquah

Issaquah tied with fellow burb Bothell on median one-bedroom rent, but the median price of a two-bedroom is notably more expensive here. Especially wild is the 3.1 percent month-over-month price growth.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,000
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,630
Year-over-year rent growth: 16.7 percent

4. Kirkland

Maybe it's the influx of Googlers at the new Kirkland office or maybe folks are just looking for more space on the other side of the lake. Whatever the reason, this Eastside city has been blazing of late, with a monthly rent increase of 2.9 percent, one of the highest in the Seattle area.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,160
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,500
Year-over-year rent growth: 17.6 percent

3. Redmond

We're sensing a pattern here. Microsofties have already been instructed to return to their offices, at least on a hybrid model, which could be fueling the demand—and rents—in Redmond. Just consider the 3.4 percent month-over-month growth.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,360
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,650
Year-over-year rent growth: 19.7 percent

2. Bellevue

Renting an apartment in Bellevue from 2021 to 2022 has to have been one wild ride, especially when you look at the city's year-over-year growth. It was the highest increase in the area and the hike is especially significant considering the national average of 16.3 percent. 
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,480
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,650
Year-over-year rent growth: 21.5 percent

1. Woodinville

Just like last month, Woodinville tops this list. It again costs more to rent a one-bedroom here than it does to rent a two-bedroom in Seattle, Mountlake Terrace, Renton, and Bothell. Gulp.
Median one-bedroom rent: $2,540
Median two-bedroom rent: $2,860
Year-over-year rent growth: 19.7 percent

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