The 2014 Seahawks's playoff victory over the Packers should never be forgotten.

Image: Mike Morris

Put simply, Seahawks games are usually weird. But few games, if any, were as strange—and thrilling—as the last time Seattle played the Green Bay Packers in the playoffs. 

Following a categorical beatdown of the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII, the Seahawks posted a 12-4 record during the 2014 regular season, dispatching the Carolina Panthers in the postseason’s divisional round to set up a matchup with the Packers in the NFC championship game at CenturyLink Field on January 18, 2015.

What followed was a game perhaps best remembered for improbable special-teams plays, but one that also featured a fair share of wacky offensive and defensive moments. With the two squads competing Sunday at Lambeau Field for a spot in the conference title game, here's a look back at their last playoff meeting.

The Deficit

After running up more than 30 points in a season-opening victory over Aaron Rodgers’s squad, the Seahawks offense laid an egg during the first two quarters of the rematch, putting zero points on the board and falling behind by 16 before halftime.

The Seahawks’s offense didn’t do themselves any favors when it came to maintaining possession, as Russell Wilson uncharacteristically threw three first-half interceptions. He would finish the game with four. This was odd: He threw seven total during that regular season.

The Defense

Despite a shoddy offensive showing, the Legion of Boom lived up to its name when it mattered most. Richard “I’m the Best Corner in the Game” Sherman came down with an end zone interception on the Packers’s first drive down the field. And with over eight minutes remaining in the second quarter, Byron Maxwell made a diving pick of his own.

The Special Comeback

While the offense still wasn’t fully clicking in the third quarter, Wilson started to make plays, including a 29-yard pass to Doug Baldwin that got the Hawks into field goal range.

That’s when some extra-special, and extra-memorable, special teams play presented itself. A fake field goal toss by punter Jon Ryan gave the team its first touchdown of the game, and late in the fourth quarter, the Seahawks recovered a bobbled onside kick. A Marshawn Lynch run from 24 yards out gave Seattle its first lead of the game with less than two minutes to play.

Kearse Control

But it could never be that easy, right? Rodgers marched his Packers up the field far enough to tie it up with a field goal in regulation, sending the game to overtime.

Wilson and company made sure Rodgers didn’t get to touch the ball again. Six plays later, the quarterback heaved a 35-yard touchdown pass to a falling Jermaine Kearse to seal the win and a place in Super Bowl XLIX.

But let’s not talk about how that one turned out.

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