Here lies love vqbrex

Seattle Rep transforms into a disco for the immersive musical Here Lies Love.

Theater

Thru May 28
Here Lies Love

Leave it to Talking Heads’ David Byrne and Fatboy Slim to hear the story of a party-loving Filipino dictator’s wife and think, this should be a musical. For Here Lies Love, Seattle Rep transforms its theater space into an immersive disco dance floor to tell the lavish tale of the rise and fall of Ferdinand Marcos’s brutal regime via decadent spectacle. Seattle Repertory Theatre, $88–$123

Thru May 6
The Secret Garden

In 1991, 11-year-old Daisy Eagan became the youngest-ever Tony winner for her portrayal of Mary Lennox in the musical version of The Secret Garden. More than 25 years later, Eagan returns to the garden to play Martha, the chambermaid who helps the orphaned young Mary adjust to her new life in England before she eventually explores the mysteries of Misselthwaite Manor and its titular locked garden. 5th Avenue Theatre, $29–$151

Apr 20–23
The Institute of Memory

It can be difficult to find connections in a father-son relationship. But Early Morning Opera artistic director Lars Jan had the added challenge of having a secrecy-obsessed Cold War operative for a dad. The Institute of Memory employs archival wire-tap transcriptions, letters from Communist spies, and a hacked typewriter to sketch a hazy vision of privacy, memory, and paternal relations. On the Boards, $25

Apr 20–May 14
Frozen

Bryony Lavery’s 2004 Tony-nominated play Frozen has nothing to do with ice princesses, but everything to do with letting it go. The drama centers around an English serial killer that murdered a 10-year-old girl, the girl’s mom, and an American psychiatrist trying to make sense of the killings. The capacity for forgiveness and remorse takes center stage as the three characters’ lives begin to intersect. ArtsWest, $38

Classical & More

Thur, Apr 20
Jóhann Jóhannsson
For composers, film and television have filled the commissioning role that royal courts once occupied. Mixing traditional and electronic instrumentation, Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson weaves dark soundscapes of ominous tones (Arrival, Sicario) and dreamy scores alike (The Theory of Everything). Join Jóhannsson and the Contemporary Music Ensemble to hear his music in the flesh. Benaroya Hall, $30–$40

Film

Sun, Apr 23
DakhaBrakha: Earth
The 1930 silent film Earth is masterful Soviet cinema with unsettling propaganda ties. It celebrates Stalin’s collectivization project, which forced Ukrainian peasants off their land and led to famine and death. Renowned Ukrainian folk quartet DakhaBrakha performs its own live score for the film in the hopes of showing the true spirit of its homeland. Neptune Theatre, $34

Special Events

Apr 20–23
MoPop Pop Conference
It’s hard to escape the political dread spiral these days, and its certainly seeping into the musical world. With that in mind, MoPop has taken a political slant with its 2017 Pop Conference. Titled Sign O’ the Times: Music and Politics, the four-day conference brings together sharp musical minds for panels and discussions about the state of the industry and where it fits in the larger geopolitical puzzle. Highlights include a keynote with David Byrne discussing his musical about martial law in the Philippines (Here Lies Love at Seattle Rep), a roundtable discussion with Tanya Tagaq, Perfume Genius, and Meredith Graves (Perfect Pussy, MTV), and music-centric talks about topics like futurism, Christianity, paranoia, black politics of the Reagan era, and more. Museum of Pop Culture, $20–$25

Comedy

Thur, Apr 20
Leafly Comedy Tour
Weed–aficionados of all backgrounds are coming together in celebration of 4/20, the unofficial holiday dedicated to lighting up and chilling out. In honor of the a-blaze-ing occasion, the Leafly Comedy Tour returns to entertain the hoards of giggly stoners. Damon Wayans Jr. (best know as Coach on New Girl) headlines the cannabis-centric comedy showcase, and Kate Berlant and local favorite Emmet Montgomery round out the bill. Did we mention tickets are appropriately only $4.20? Proceeds from the show will benefit Rise Up, a social impact initiative that works to promote positive social change, environmental sustainability, and social justice in Jamaica and the U.S. Humor and helping humanity, talk about a joint cause. Neptune Theatre, $4.20 

Apr 20–22
Kyle Kinane
The glory of Kyle Kinane’s standup comedy comes from the way he makes everyone feel like he’s their kind-hearted, knuckleheaded buddy who occasionally drinks a bit too much but ends up with some crazy stories. His 2016 special Loose in Chicago delivered a gut-busting array of barfly tales about Hell’s Angels, food snobbery, and his gout diagnosis. Tacoma Comedy Club, $17–$29

Visual Art

Thru Apr 23
Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series
Seattle painter Jacob Lawrence provided an essential African American artistic voice for the city between his arrival in 1971 and death in 2000. To mark the 100th anniversary of his birth, Seattle Art Museum displays all 60 panels of his masterwork, The Migration Series. Painting with the vivid colors and blocky shapes of his self-described “dynamic cubism” style, the series depicts African Americans moving en masse from the rural South to the industrial North after World War I with blunt emotional force. This marks the first time in over 20 years that the collection has been displayed in its entirety on the West Coast. Now in its final week at SAM, don't miss this rare chance to see this collection together in one room. Seattle Art Museum, $25

Thru May 1
Fred Lisaius: Thrive
Fred Lisaius finds solace in the depths of nature. Thrive continues the local painter’s appreciation of the natural world with a collection featuring his distinct style: lots of vibrant colors, delicate winged creatures, and bright foliage. The exhibit showcases Lisaius intentionally subverting reality by depicting flora and fauna that wouldn’t actually coexist—like trees with an array of disparate flowers and leaves—in order to probe at themes such as cultivation, family, and living in harmony. All the while, his purposeful use of acrylics mirrors the refreshing simplicity of nature itself. Patricia Rovzar Gallery, Free

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Art

Fred Lisaius: Thrive

11:00 AM Free Patricia Rovzar Gallery

Fred Lisaius finds solace in the depths of nature. Thrive continues the local painter's appreciation of the natural world with a collection featuring his dis...

Art

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

Editor’s Pick 10:00 AM $20 Seattle Art Museum

Seattle painter Jacob Lawrence provided an essential African American artistic voice for the city between his arrival in 1971 and death in 2000. To mark the ...

Concerts, Film

DakhaBrakha: Earth

Editor’s Pick $34 Neptune Theatre

The 1930 silent film Earth is masterful Soviet cinema with unsettling propaganda ties. It celebrates Stalin’s collectivization project, which forced Ukrainia...

Classical Music

Jóhann Jóhannsson

Editor’s Pick $30-$40 Benaroya Hall

For composers, film and television have filled the commissioning role that royal courts once occupied. Mixing traditional and electronic instrumentation, Ice...

Theater

Frozen

Editor’s Pick 7:30 PM $38 ArtsWest

Bryony Lavery’s 2004 Tony-nominated play Frozen has nothing to do with ice princesses, but everything to do with letting it go. The drama centers around an E...

Theater

The Institute of Memory

Editor’s Pick 8:00 PM $23–$25 On the Boards

It can be difficult to find connections in a father-son relationship. But Early Morning Opera artistic director Lars Jan had the added challenge of having a ...

Theater

The Secret Garden

Editor’s Pick 2:00 PM and 8:00 PM $29-$151 5th Avenue Theatre

In 1991, 11-year-old Daisy Eagan became the youngest-ever Tony winner for her portrayal of Mary Lennox in the musical version of The Secret Garden. More than...