Friday Fizz LIKES & DISLIKES


1. Fizz LIKES that the city is currently trying to rally the Montlake neighborhood around a less-expensive second bridge to run alongside the current Montlake bridge as part of its 520 pitch to the legislature; the west side of the project—including completing the 520 bridge itself and connecting the Montlake neighborhood to the Husky light rail station—is still an estimated $1.4 billion shy.

Originally, the second Montlake bridge was going to be a more expensive bridge designed to accommodate extra buses, saddling the neighborhood with two bus-heavy overpasses. But the new design would use traffic management improvements to keep the additional bus traffic on the existing Montlake Bridge while exclusively serving bikes and peds with a second bridge. (With new bike and ped access on the 520 bridge, plus the new light rail stop at Husky Stadium, bike and ped traffic is expected to increase dramatically.) 

Building a less expensive ped/bike-only connection between Montlake and Husky Stadium will both appeal to cost-conscious (particularly when it comes to Seattle) Olympia Republicans and appeal to the neighborhood which would suddenly be connected to the U. District and light rail in an emerging ped-friendly urban network.

In addition to a Fizz LIKE, file that under "Deep Walkability."   

The bridge crossing the Montlake Cut is still in the think-phase, but to give you an idea of the possibilities, here are some renderings of the 520 Montlake "Lid" proposal that connects the Montlake neighborhood (on the south of 520) to the Shelby/Hamlin neighborhood (on the North of 520), but all south of the Montlake Cut.  

2. File this as a follow-up to yesterday's item on the city council's legislative agenda which, I reported, failed to include council member Kshama Sawant's explicit call for rent control. 

Not gonna file this as a Fizz LIKE, but we'll presume it's a Sawant LIKE.

Her astute, lefty council colleague, veteran City Council member Nick Licata, amended the city's Olympia agenda. Compare and contrast; we've bolded his amendment. 

BEFORE

We support gender equity and family-friendly workplace policies, such as paycheck fairness, parental leave and affordable childcare, so that all people across gender lines thrive economically and are safe and healthy. We support local governments' ability to adopt standards to protect the health, safety, and well-being of their residents. 

AFTER

We support gender equity and family-friendly workplace policies, such as paycheck fairness, parental leave and affordable childcare, so that all people across gender lines thrive economically and are safe and healthy. We support local governments' ability to adopt standards to protect the health, safety, and well-being of their residents, to adopt tax measures that do not unfairly burden those in need, and oppose preemption of local regulations related to retaining housing affordability.

Licata's amendment is hardly an endorsement of rent control. But state law currently preempts rent control—and while there's no bill in play in the state legislature trying to undo that prempetion, if there was, it looks to me like the city would officially support it now.

Calling newly elected state senator Pramila Jayapal? 

3. Fizz LIKES that at his Wednesday night concert at Key Arena this week, Stevie Wonder paused before busting out his 1973 sociopolitical hit "Living for the City," and broke it down on Ferguson and Staten Island. (The Eric Garner non-indictment had just hit that afternoon.)

 

With the legendary electric keyboard riff backing him, here's what Wonder said before hitting the song: 

"Can you believe that within one month, two secret grand juries declined to indict two policemen for the killing of two Black men? I just don't understand that. 

Let me just say this also: I don't understand why a legal system would choose secrecy when there's so much mistrust of what they're saying. I don't understand why there could not have been a public trial where we would be able to hear all sides ... I just don't understand that. 

I tell you what I do understand. I heard Eric Garner say, with my own ears: 'I Can't Breathe.' And as much as he's apologized, I don't understand why he [the policeman] did not stop. .. I've heard politicians say, you've got all this black-on-black crime, but my feeling's that guns are too accessible to everybody. 

I do understand that something is wrong, real wrong. And we as family, Americans, all of us of all colors, need to fix it with a quickness, real soon.

I really love you, you know that. This is why this song unfortunately is still relevant today... If you know the words you can sing along with me..." 

 

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