Today’s picks for civic nerds.

For Wednesday:

Edison's Invention Still Creates Innovation

Was Edison's creation of the light bulb a catalyst for the nation's tech transformation? Author Ernest Freeberg sure thinks so, and he'll tell you why and how by describing how it was created and the reactions of people who saw it for the first time.

Ernest Freeberg: How Edison's Light Blub Changed Invention—and Us, Wed March 13, 6–7:30, Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave, Seattle, $5.

Made in China? Maybe not.

Will clothes forever bear tags declaring, "Made in China?" Textile and apparel specialist Stacy Flynn will talk about the future of clothing, and how to be a part of a community that buys and supports ecologically and economically sustainable apparel.   

The Future of Clothing: Net Impact Bainbridge Graduate Institute, Wed March 13, 6–9pm, The HUB Seattle, 222 Second Ave, Seattle, free. 

For Tuesday: 

Eager Engineers

If the free Snoqualmie Ice Cream doesn't interest you, maybe the work EWB is doing with developing communities worldwide to improve quality of life will. The organization hires and trains engineering professionals and students to implement sustainable engineering projects.

Engineers Without Borders at Makerhaus, Tue March 12, 5:30–9, Makerhaus, 122 NW 36th St, Seattle, $5 suggested donation.

And For Today:

Share the Road and Your Seat

Car sharing has hit Seattle, and it's about time for bikers to follow the trend. Have lunch and discuss how to make Seattle even greener through bike-sharing.

Brown Bag Lunch: Puget Sound Bike Share, Wed March 11, 12–1:30, GGLO Space at the Steps, 1305 First Ave, Seattle, $5. 

Big Data: Know What You Didn't Know You Didn't Know

From Google searches foreshadowing the H1N1 flu outbreak to what paint color tells you about the shape of a used car, find out how to use the internet for data analysis.

Viktor Mayer-Schõnberger and Kenneth Cukier: Big Data: The Next Best Thing, Mon March 11, 7:30–9, Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave, Seattle, $5. 

Want to see your nerdy event featured on the PubliCalendar?
Send the details to Anna at publicalendar@seattlemet.com.

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