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1. The International Longshore Workers' Union Local 19, which proposed an amendment to the city's comprehensive plan that would bar any arena proposal that "significantly" interferes with industrial and maritime uses in SoDo, sent a letter to the city council yesterday reiterating their belief that the proposed arena site is a bad pick, and that alternate sites---they mentioned the former site of Sick's Stadium in the Rainier Valley,  which is now a Lowe's; Memorial Stadium at Seattle Center; and “a parcel offered by the Muckleshoot Tribe in 2007 when (the) NBA was leaving Seattle.”

"In an alternate location, we would not have to trade jobs in hand for jobs in theory, we would be able to provide employment in the Building Trades and Hospitality Industry without impacting Maritime and Industrial jobs; the civic and community benefits would be portable to an alternate location and the civic pride can be had through a regional solution as well as a Seattle-centric one," the letter, signed by ILWU 19 president Cam Williams, said.

2. Re: State Sen. Michael Baumgartner's email:

Baumgartner told the press yesterday that the two-line email he sent me late Monday night telling me to "go fuck yourself" was part of a larger, personal private conversation between us.

That's not true.

I interviewed state Sen. Baumgartner on the record on the phone on Monday afternoon about US Rep. Todd Akin's position that women shouldn't be allowed to have abortions in instances of rape. Baumgartner believes the same thing, and like Akin, Baumgartner is running for the US Senate on the GOP ticket.

Baumgartner condemned Akin's now-infamous theory that women who are raped don't get pregnant, but defended his own policy position that women shouldn't have the right to get abortions if they've been raped. I wrote an article about this on Monday after our phone interview.

In the same article, I also noted that Baumgartner told me his campaign was not about the "culture wars" but was focused on jobs and ending the war in Afghanistan.

I included that footnote in the article because at the beginning of the interview, also on the record, Baumgartner took a few moments to complain that reporters weren't covering his opposition to the war in Afghanistan, and he was frustrated that instead, he was getting a call about abortion.

My article, however, focused on the news of the day—women's health care, which I think is just as important for a US senate candidate to talk about as the war in Afghanistan.

Several hours later, Baumgartner sent me his angry email. This was the first I'd heard from Baumgartner since our on-the-record phone interview.

After getting the email, I tried to contact him several times. He did not respond. I reached him once, but after I identified myself, we were disconnected, and I was not able to ask him about the email.

After leaving a final message on Tuesday morning alerting his campaign that I intended to publish the email, I still did not hear back. I eventually published his email that afternoon.

The only part of the email exchange that I left out of my post on Tuesday was my reply. Here it is in full:

"? Is this really Sen. Baumgartner?"

3. The Seattle Chamber of Commerce, which takes positions on state initiatives, has put out a survey to its members on two initiatives---Tim Eyman's I-1185 ,which would reaffirm the two-thirds legislative requirement for raising taxes, and I-1240, which would create a charter school pilot program in Washington State.

In its email to members, the Chamber says the survey will be used to "evaluate" both measures; the survey itself asks members to say both where they stand on both measures and what they consider the best and worst reasons for voting for each.

Chamber spokesman George Allen did not immediately return a call seeking more information about how the group plans to use the results of the survey, but as we recently reported in Fizz, earlier this month, the group's policy committee recommended that the full group come out against 1185.

4. Speaking of the November election, the campaign to  rebuild the downtown seawall (so far, there is no campaign against rebuilding the seawall) got a $20,000 infusion earlier this month courtesy of downtown developer Martin Smith and a group called Piers 55 & 56 LLC, which apparently represents Argosy Cruises.

Both Smith and Piers 55 & 56 gave $10,000 to the pro-seawall cause. That money will offset the cost of a poll the seawall campaign did last month, which came in at nearly $16,000.
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