Shi Shi Beach

EASY Renowned for its presettler vibe, the hike to Shi Shi Beach winds through the Makah Indian Reservation’s old-growth coastal forests, a dense collection of mature cedars and Sitka spruces that enclose this muddy, albeit manageable trail. Two miles in and you’re the latest Lost survivor of the Northwest standing atop a 150-foot bluff, staring at the panoramic view of the Pacific. The descent, unsuitable for toddlers, is a battle with the brambles, but the payout? Eagles circling over tidal pools and silky sand that puts rocky Washington beaches to shame. With tide guide in hand, hike south toward the Point of the Arches sea stacks—vast rock formations that stand like the toppled ruins of a grand fortress. —Hayley Poole

Round Trip 4 miles. Duration 2.5 hours. Distance from Downtown 150 miles, plus Edmonds–Kingston ferry. Permits and Passes Makah Recreation Pass. Map Green Trails no. 98S Cape Flattery. Find it 


Ozette Triangle 

EASY Who knew a three-mile boardwalk led to one of the wildest beaches in America? Follow the cedar-planked trail from Lake Ozette to Cape Alava—through a mist-shrouded forest of mossy cedars, past prairies where tenacious homesteaders battled incessant rains. Once you reach the rocky beach, enjoy a three-mile stroll south, peering into tidal pools offering squishy urchins to ravenous gulls or searching for petroglyphs left three centuries ago by the Makah tribe. Head back via the Sand Point trailhead for the return leg of the triangle. INSIDER TIP Boardwalks can be slick. —Craig Romano

Round Trip 9.4 miles. Duration 6 hours. Distance from Downtown 150 miles, plus Edmonds–Kingston ferry. Permits and Passes National Park Entrance fee; dogs prohibited. Map Green Trails no. 130S Ozette. Find it.


Grand Valley

DIFFICULT The wind blows dusty shale across your boots as you trek alpine tundra along a ridge 6,200 feet above sea level. Yes, this is the entry to Grand Valley, but it gets better. Hike downhill along the gently sloping Badger Valley trail into the valley itself—named after a ranger’s favorite horse, not the critter. Continue to Moose Lake—where there are no moose—and you’ll find pristine meadows and subalpine forests, home to marmot, deer, and the occasional bear or cougar. Lest you think this should be called Misnomer Valley, keep your eyes turned to the sweeping views of the Olympics as you trek in and out. INSIDER TIPSnowfields can linger well into July along the ridge; exercise caution. —CR

Round Trip 9 miles. Duration 6 hours. Distance from Downtown 
95 miles, plus Edmonds–Kingston ferry. Permits and Passes National 
Park Entrance fee; dogs prohibited. Map Green Trails no. 134S Elwha 
North/Hurricane Ridge. Find it.


Bogachiel Peak 

DIFFICULT This 5,474-foot peak, a former fire lookout with breathtaking views, cuts through the heart of Olympic National Park’s famed High Divide—a Shangri-la of lakes, meadows, and waterfalls. The trail rises up, up, way up Bogachiel (more than 3,000 feet) via Deer Lake. But don’t just storm up it. Take a minute, grab a handful of wild huckleberries, and listen for bugling elk. When you reach the top, say hello to the glistening white mass of Mount Olympus, highest summit on the Olympic Peninsula. Then cast your eyes down nearly one vertical mile to the emerald swath of the Hoh Rain Forest below. INSIDER TIP Excellent backcountry camping opportunities; secure permit(s) from ranger station. Be bear aware. —CR

Round Trip 16 miles. Duration 10 hours. Distance from Downtown 120 miles, plus Edmonds–Kingston ferry. Permits and Passes National Park Entrance fee; dogs prohibited. Map Green Trails no. 133S Seven Lakes Basin. Find it.

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