DO YOU REMEMBER the first time you practiced your cursive signature and later that day…the 500th time? The process of designing and redesigning our magazine’s logo was just like that, perhaps ratcheted up just a touch, like from a 1 to a 10 on the Richter scale. What do we want people to see, to feel, to think, all in just one glance? It’s a lot of pressure. And in the case of Seattle Met, when do you decide to make your nickname your signature? We’re proud to say that Seattle Met, like its fellow Seattle denizens, is positively brimming with overthinking.

When we launched this magazine in March 2006 we made a promise that we would work our very hardest to inform and entertain you about all things Seattle. You rewarded us by making us the best-selling and largest-circulation magazine in the area. To that end, we feel it’s essential that we continue to innovate. As we see in the pages of the magazine each month, Seattle is a city of innovation, and, as a member of this esteemed community, we view it as a necessity to keep pace with it.

So embark we did on this heady task: Script? Serif? Sans serif? Benjamen Purvis, our art director, has been nothing short of a saint; listening and responding to our random and many-times incredibly unhelpful feedback. Examples: “too heavy…too small…too feminine…too trendy… I don’t like the S …the T s are awkward…the L is too tall…the M doesn’t feel right…” or my personal favorite, “Does it look like an elephant to anyone else?” embarrassingly proffered by yours truly. I think you get the idea. Group design is such a pleasant thought to an art director. But in every case Ben handled it with grace, steadfast commitment, and most especially, remarkable talent.

And so we give you Seattle Met’s new logo. In the spirit of the technologically advanced city that we call home: Seattle Met 2.0. We hope you love it as much as we do. (We really, really do!) We also thought you might enjoy a look at the crazy process. We have a full portfolio of Ben’s sketches. As always, we love hearing your thoughts.

One final request, please don’t spend any time looking at my signature, it suddenly feels all wrong.
Nicole Vogel, Publisher


To read a related note from art director Benjamen Purvis, click HERE.

Filed under
Show Comments