I'm certainly not the only one to have pointed out the influence and impact of the mixed-use co-op space Love City Love over the last year or so. The name(s) have become synonymous with innovative programming (from fashion shows and photoshoots to popup shops and gallery settings), good times, and the sort of stylish, engaged, interesting crowd that's truly changing the way we see ourselves and each other.

LCL is both more and less than a venue though. It's the crew behind the scenes—Lucien Pellegrin, Jessica Carter, Avi Loud among them—that makes it what it is, wherever it is. Love City Love is in its second incarnation now, and as of the final show on Friday, March 28, they'll be (eventually at least) on to their next to-be-determined physical space.

So that's the first thing you need to know: yes,  LCL is shuttering due to you know, progress and real estate and all that.

The second thing you need to know is that the work of one of the top fashion minds in Seattle today is behind the final hooray.

One-time Seattle Met contributor Ashley Helvey is one of those people who works behind the scenes and out in the public arena as well; as editorial creative director at Totokaelo she has a hand in the look, feel and high style of the venerated brand, and as a textile artist she brings old forms and crafts into the new world—in Seattle and elsewhere.

The final LCL show, called #IRL, is Helvey's attempt to comment on our image-saturated environment. From Instagram and Tumblr to, yes, the real world, and back, we're swimming in content. You can like it, you can steal it, you can be offended or annoyed by it, you can reblog it, and you can drown in it.

Or you can be inspired and motivated by it.

With her distinctly modern of-the-earth and yet somehow other-worldly aesthetic, Helvey presents "three-dimensional works that often rely on simple, found or repurposed materials, with a distinct focus on their inherent form and appearance," the Facebook event page will tell you. "This exhibition celebrates the impact of technology and social media and its wealth of imagery as direct inspiration for creating real and tangible art objects."

I imagine there will be a lot of Instagramming going on, and later, maybe the next day, people will wake up ready to do and make and think and create.

So go because you want to experience one last photogenic night at 1430 Summit Ave, or because you're happy to get caught-up in the philosophical permentations of picutre-casting and thing-making in the 20-teens, or because you enjoy the body-buzz of standing in an attractively lit room with well-dressed residents of your city.

They're all equally valid.

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