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To break or not to break? Porcelain fortune cookies at Object are perfect for drifters and wayward souls. But design freaks, craft collectors, and artful modernists would appreciate them also.

Who gets it: The drifter. The lost. The unsure. The one who obsesses over his/her horoscope while they’re reading tea leaves and consulting ancient runes and insisting that they’re just really having a hard time finding themselves.

Why: Aleksandra Pollner’s porcelain fortune cookies, made in collaboration with photographer, collector, and all-around enthusiast Charlie Schuck for Object, his art-and-gift gallery-and-shop, offer a kind of delicate, durable clairvoyancy. The rough-smooth, smashable-savable rendering of the American icon (I mean, we know these things do not exist in China, right?) sets up an existential dilemma (to break or not to break?) that ought to smack that wayward soul right into a steady job, a heated apartment, and a healthy, plant-based diet.

And yes, there is a fortune in each porcelain ‘cookie’, should your drifter go that route; the artist commissioned an ‘actual psychic’ (I’m not totally sure what that means) to write them.

Oh, and they’re 12 bucks each.

Where to find it: Object, which, it must be noted, is no longer a pop-up shop that you have to be friends with someone on Facebook to get invited into. It did start that way, and the opening parties in Schuck’s loft were pretty much epic, which is another word for ‘a who’s who of Seattle design, culture, fashion, and art.’ It’s also another word for ‘crowded and impossible to actually shop at’, which is why it’s great to see the locally and internationally made objects gathered in a ground floor storefront. (Recognize it? The space was previously occupied by Screaming Trees’ Mark Pickeral, who set it up as a sort of uber-record shop but it didn’t quite fly.)

 

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The interior of Object on Second Ave across the street from Tavolata.

Find exceptionally well made, smartly conceptualized products from Seattle artists like Grain, Iacoli & McAllister, and Meet Me Here as well as cult Japanese designers and found treasures at this Belltown stop, but keep watch for artist/Object collaborations. There’s something inherently “us” and imaginatively descriptive about what comes from Schuck and his cohorts when they get specific and targeted.

Special note to procrastinators: This is kinda insane but Schuck pledges to be at Object on Christmas morning from 6:30 to 11 in order that you might set off to your holiday gathering with some really lovely and special gifts for your friends and family, instead of the windshield scraper and tube of Blistex that you would have to settle for at 7-11.

(Full disclosure: Among the objects at Object is a small chapbook of sorts that contains work by Lily Raskind, Izzie Klingels, Justine Ashbee, and me; it was designed by Seattle Met art director Andre Mora.)