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The bar is made from wood from the decommissioned Italian embassy in Buenos Aires; the floors come from an old Seattle schoolhouse.
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Glass factory windows surround the open kitchen area, dominated by Stoneburner's slate-clad stone hearth oven.
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The barrel-like ceiling in the entry space is clad in fir from an old building right on Ballard Ave. Also in the entry space: a racy Slicer Mito Italian meat slicer and marble-topped charcuterie station.
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Swing-arm seats at the kitchen bar.
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The ceiling oval is another component of the former embassy; I am so envious of these Italian 1960s-era chandeliers it's not even funny.
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Come opening day these riddling racks will be filled with bottles of wine.
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Seriously, can these guys just open a lighting shop already?
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Custom concrete tiles.
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Sigh.
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A doorway in the richly detailed wall of wood paneling in the dining room connects Stoneburner to the rest of the hotel.
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Steel gates from the turn of the century help divide the 3,500-square-foot space.
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Large sliding windows open up onto Ballard Ave.
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Most of the chairs look like they belong in a schoolhouse from the first part of the century (because at one point they did).
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A roof finial from an old building in Baltimore dominates the bar (and probably still will even when the shelves are filled with bottles).
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