Caffeinated News & Gossip

1. Fizz has another name to add to the list of people who are supposedly thinking about jumping in to next year's mayoral race: Albert Shen, a businesses consultant whose firm Shen Consulting, which grew out of Shen's work advising the Port of Seattle and Sea-Tac's capital improvement program in the last 90s, specializes in major infrastructure projects.  He also runs a firm that helps attract Asian capital to Washington.

In 2009, he won a city small business award from the mayor. 

Here's another name to add to the list of people who are supposedly thinking about jumping in to next year's mayor's race: Business consultant Albert Shen

Other names on the growing list of people eyeing the mayor's race against incumbent Mike McGinn: City Council members Tim Burgess and Bruce Harrell, state Sen. Ed Murray, former City Council member Peter Steinbrueck, and Seattle Chamber President and CEO Maud Daudon.

Fizz says: Don't underestimate low-profile council member Harrell. And don't count McGinn out.

2. The Philadelphia-based political ad firm Shorr, Johnson, and Magnus has been getting serious postelection props for its hit piece on Mitt Romney; early in the election, their independent expenditure ads (funded by pro-Obama super PAC Priorities USA) demonized Romney's record at Bain Capital. One of their ads, featuring testimony from a longtime Indiana paper plant worker who got laid off in a Bain deal, is being credited for framing the debate early on in Ohio and perhaps even delivering the state to Obama.

You know what else SJM did: Jay Inslee's ads, including Inslee's initial ad defining his Republican opponent Rob McKenna as an elitist technocrat while introducing Inslee as a, well, dude.

Altogether, Inslee's camp spent nearly $10 million on SJM.

3. And here's the latest dispatch from the nail biter in the 17th Legislative District—where Democatic challenger state Rep. Tim Probst (D-17, Vancouver) was just 96 votes behind Republican incumbent state Sen. Don Benton (R-17, Vancouver) at the end of last week: The Columbian reports that Clark County elections discovered 1,178 unprocessed ballots.