City Council member Tim Burgess, one of several officials who has long been rumored to be considering a run for mayor, made it official this afternoon, filing his first campaign-finance compliance report at 5:00. 

Burgess says he's filing in time to comply with city rules, which mandate that candidates must file official papers no more than two weeks after they start raising or spending money on their campaigns; Burgess launched a new web site two weeks ago. 

"I would say that it’s leadership and the ability to get things done."—Burgess on the difference between  McGinn and him.

In an interview with me earlier this afternoon, Burgess declined to name specific issues he would focus on or specific deficiencies he sees in Mayor Mike McGinn's leadership over the past three-plus years. "I would say that it’s leadership and the ability to get things done, rather than grade or evalauate Mike McGinn. I think I'd rather talk about what I would bring to that office and leave it up to you pundits to decide the differences," Burgess said.

In a statement, however, he focused on his advocacy for the Families and Education Levy; his work on behalf of children sold into sex slavery; and his advocacy for programs like the Nurse Family Partnership, an early-intervention program for low-income moms. 

In a sign of just how serious (and prime time) Burgess is, we should note that his campaign manager is Emily Walters, the recent field director for Democrat Jay Inslee's successful campaign for governor, which, at last count, was winning by 94,000 votes. Campaign insiders credit Inslee's win, in part, to its massive GOTV and door-knocking effort (the Inslee camp says "millions of doors") that dwarfed his Republican opponent, Rob McKenna's, field operation. 

Burgess also announced several endorsements, including one from firefighters' union leader Kenny Stuart and one from former Seattle housing department director Adrienne Quinn, who left the McGinn administration shortly after his election in 2009.