Caffeinated news & gossip. Your daily Morning Fizz.

1. As six Occupy Seattle protesters were arrested after they linked themselves together on the floor and refused to leave a Chase Bank on Capitol Hill yesterday afternoon and others were pepper-sprayed when they climbed onto and in front of police cars on Broadway, the protester who holds the permit allowing tents at city hall, Michael Dare, took another approach.

Dare is asking city council members to support a resolution stating that "All corporations doing business with the government must be non-profit."

"Seems to solve a lot of problems with one swoop," Dare wrote the council.

The problem such a proposal would run into, city hall staffers were quick to point out, is the fact that there isn't a single nonprofit construction company, uniform company, office supply or equipment company in existence that could bid to do business with the city.

Meanwhile, after the clash on Broadway, 300 protesters converged at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Seattle where Chase Bank CEO Jamie Dimon was speaking.[pullquote]The response from fellow Democratic candidates to Darcy Burner's announcement that she's joining the fray to fill US Rep. Jay Inslee's seat came fast and furious.[/pullquote]

2. The response from fellow Democratic candidates to Darcy Burner's announcement yesterday that she's joining the fray to fill US Rep. Jay Inslee's open seat came fast and furious.

State Rep. Marko Liias (D-21, Edmonds) issued a conveniently timed press release hyping his 1,500 new donors. Liias likes to talk about numbers of donors rather than the size of their donations, spinning his candidacy, which has been on the bottom of the fundraising ladder ($48,000), as taking the "lead in grassroots support."

Liias also hyped his trip to D.C. last week, where, along with a batch of other progressive congressional candidates who have allied themselves with the Occupy Wall Street movement, he helped deliver 35,000 signatures to Speaker John Boehner's office (video here) asking Boehner to pass President Obama's jobs bill.

And the fundraising frontrunner ($182,000), former state legislator Laura Ruderman, hit with an email to supporters recounting her own trip to DC last week, where she met with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and was told fundraising is the key.

"The good news," she wrote, "is that right now I have raised the most money and have the most cash on hand." (Ruderman has $148,794 cash on hand. Her closest rival on that score is little-known Bothell entrepreneur and Democratic activist, surprise fundraising star Darshan Rauniyar, who has $99,938 cash on hand.)

Meanwhile, long-shot candidate Andrew Hughes, a young attorney (and also a fundraising surprise with $140,00o raised and $84,000 on hands), fired off a more direct response to Burner's announcement. He criticized Burner as a Capitol Hill insider for leading two nonprofits founded by liberal house members in DC to promote liberal candidates and causes.
Darcy's commitment is not to the voters of this area, but rather to her own apparent insatiable career aspirations. In the meantime, she has ingratiated herself to the very system and establishment leaders we need to change ... For the last seven years, Darcy has been promoting Darcy. Over the next 12 months I will promote the interests of the middle class, small business owners, and those that don't have the luxury of seven years to find permanent employment

3. Seattle-area State Rep. Zack Hudgins (D-11) announced today that he's running for Washington Secretary of State. Longtime Republican Secretary of State Sam Reed announced in late June that he's retiring when his term is up in January 2013.

Conservative Democratic state Sen. Jim Kastama (D-25, Puyallup) has already declared that he's running for the spot. Thurston County Auditor Kim Wyman is the Republican candidate.