Caffeinated News & Gossip

Sorry for the delay, but dig the redesign. Here's yesterday's Fizz.

And here's today's:

1. At 36th District state house candidate Noel Frame's fundraiser last night at the Queen Anne home of former Seattle City Council member Tina Podlodowski (who's gay), Frame's campaign started spreading the word around (something they'd known for a few days) that that Equal Rights Washington, the premeire gay local gay rights group, has endorsed her.

Frame, who worked on the domestic partners campaign, R-71, in 2009, is running against Seattle Port Comissioner Gael Tarleton.

ERW director Joshua Friedes was in the house to confirm.

Frame was also endorsed by MoveOn.org.

2. One question Fizz has about the controversial Jay Inslee TV ad (the one that's getting panned by the press, PubliCola included, where Inslee accuses Rob McKenna of proposing a tax increase—is this: Why did the Inslee campaign, ahead in public polling, think they had to go negative?

Did the Inslee camp's internal tracking polling tell them that they were lagging? That maybe McKenna was beating them among independent voters? Those all-important independent voters on the Eastside who don't like property tax increases?

Oh, just a theory.

Meanwhile, sources tell Fizz that internal polling by independent lefty groups has Inslee ahead by a comfortable margin—eight points ahead.

With conservative Democrats such as Sen. Rodney Tom and Tim Sheldon already in place to help, just a couple of wins could give the Republicans control next year.

3. Speaking of polling, suddenly a fifth seat may be in play in the battle between Democrats and Republicans over the control of the state senate.

(Democrats currently have a 27-22 advantage and Republicans are looking to pick up a net gain of one or two seats in the head-to-heads in the 10th, the 5th, the 1st, and the 17th. With conservative Democrats such as Sen. Rodney Tom and Tim Sheldon already in place to help, just a couple of wins could give the Republicans control next year.)

However, enter the 41st, where Republian state Sen. Steve Litzow, is now facing a tough challenge from Democratic candidate Maureen Judge, former director of the Washington Toxics Coaltion. 

Despite Litzow's liberal record on social issues—a must in the Eastside Seattle suburbs—Judge's campaaing has made a stink about his procedural vote last session to table the Reproductive Parity Act. With women's issues haunting the GOP this year and (evidently) some promising new polling, Judge's camp released an ad yesterday focusing on reproductive rights.

4. Speaking of videos. In case you missed it (though, we doubt you have): Rob McKenna dancing Gangnam style at the Washington State Korean Association Korean Day event on Saturday.

Wow. Not sure what to say.

#Asians?

4. A little bit more on state Sen. Michael Baumgartner's (R-6, Spokane) appearance on KIT talk radio in Yakima earlier this week (Baumgartner is running a longshot campaign against incumbent Democratic U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell.)

Baumgartner criticized Cantwell for voting againt the Keystone pipeline. His complaint is that Cantwell is being a NIMBY about environmentalism, taking a stand against carbon here, but ignoring the global picture. "If you're concerned about global warming," he said, "we have to focus on what India and China are burning."

Baumgartner is right about thinking globally, which is exactly why voting against the Keystone pipeline makes sense: The Keystone XL plan would get from American Gulf Coast seaports and ship it overseas to places like Asia.

Oil is a global commodity. Supporting production in North America doesn't decrease our dependency on foreign oil so much as it puts more oil into the marketplace and ultimately more greenhouse gases into the environment.

We have a message in to the Baumgartner campaing.

5. Speaking of Keystone, Koch Industries (the famous Tea Party backers supposedly have a stake in the Keystone deal) has shown up with an independent expenditure in Washington state again (they spent cash here in the 2010 cycle as well.)

It's not the millions they usually contribute to Republicans and conservative causes nationally, but they did report a $720 independent expenditure this week supporting GOP gubernatorial candidate Rob McKenna and a slate of GOP candidates for state legislature.