1. In mid-September, you'll remember, Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert spoofed U.S. Rep. Jim McDermott (D-WA, 7)

As part of his "Know Your District" series, Colbert sat down with McDermott to grill him about Seattle's godless, gay, liberal Congressional district. Colbert started out, though, quizzing McDermott about big butts and Sir Mix-A-Lot. 

McDermott, who wasn't familiar with Sir Mix-A-Lot nor his epic hit, had no idea what was happening. "I'm trying to ascertain in the clearest way possible," a consternated Colbert asked Seattle's longtime U.S. congressman, "if you like big butts."

Rep. McDermott is redeemed. On Saturday night McDermott made the scene at Neumos for Sir Mix-A-Lot's show, and, according to his political handler, "got to meet Mix after his set backstage."

2. In more Seattle celebrity news: Sounders star Obafemi Martins tweeted out his endorsement of socialist City Council candidate Kshama Sawant right before Saturday's playoff game against Portland.

Sawant raised $45,000 in October, which to quote her press release means she "passed the $100,000 mark in campaign donations, an unprecedented feat for any city council campaign accepting no corporate donations—let alone one of an open socialist." 

3. On Saturday, mayoral candidate and state Sen. Ed Murray held a press conference with Planned Parenthood supporters responding to the McGinn campaign’s request that Planned Parenthood, which has endorsed Murray, mention that McGinn, too, is pro-choice when they make calls on Murray’s behalf."The type of attack that they launched on Planned Parenthood was over the line and needed to be called out. I've never seen anything like it in a Seattle campaign."–Planned Parenthood board member Jeff Sprung

McGinn staffers, as we reported, also listed the cell phone number of a Planned Parenthood spokeswoman on Facebook and encouraged McGinn supporters to call her to protest the group’s support for Murray.

"The fact that they went so far as to put staff members’ personal cell phone numbers on Facebook amounts to cyberbulling," Murray said. "I have a 100 percent record with Planned Parenthood, including fighting the far right, expanding funding for low-income women, and preserving funding for Planned Parenthood during hard times. I’m not questioning the mayor’s beliefs or progressive values as he does with me."

Jeff Sprung, a PPVNW board member, said the group's endorsement "was not a vote against Mike McGinn—it was a vote for Senator Murray. For the past 18 years, he has fought for issues that are important to us. Our message, our script in those calls, was 100 percent positive." (Indeed, as we reported last week, the Planned Parenthood callers didn't even mention McGinn.)

"The type of attack that they launched on Planned Parenthood was over the line and needed to be called out. I've never seen anything like it in a Seattle campaign," Sprung said. 

Asked about his request that Planned Parenthood talk about his own record in their pro-Murray calls, McGinn told PubliCola, "Clearly, Planned Parenthood has the right to call people up and say what they want to say, and [McGinn campaign manager] Bill Monto has the right to ask them to say something about my record. ... 

"We were getting a lot of phone calls from people who were very confused when they got the Planned Parenthood phone calls because they were left with the impression that I was not 100 percent pro-choice, and as you know, NARAL has given me a 100 percent rating." 

Fizz also asked McGinn whether his labor supporters—UNITE HERE 8, the hotel and restaurant workers' union, and UFCW Local 21, the grocery workers' union, have spent tens of thousands in support of McGinn—should have to mention Murray's 95 percent lifetime pro-labor record when they make calls on McGinn's behalf. "If people are upset with something that the hotel and restaurant workers said, they can contact the hotel and restaurant workers," McGinn said. 

For the latest on Seattle news and politics sign up for our Seattle Met Daily newsletter, subscribe to PubliCola’s RSS Feed, follow us on Twitter @publicolanews and @SeattleMet, and visit our News & Profiles page.