1. In case you missed it, late yesterday afternoon Erica published a troubling story—confirmed by Mayor Mike McGinn's office—about McGinn adviser Chris Bushnell: In his work as a chief economist at King County and at his polling firm Constituent Dynamics, Bushnell falsely claimed he had a PhD. Bushnell went as far as to print the false information on his business card.

Weird stuff.

2. Just one day after she "secured a comittment" (she says) from her adversary, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, to fast track $30 billion in repaid loans from bailed out Wall Street banks to community banks, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA) is continuing to push her populist putsch.



Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA)

Today, Cantwell is holding a press conference in the Capitol to promote a bill she's proposed to close loopholes that allow "dark market derivatives trading." More specifically, she wants to lower the standard of proof for government regulators to prove that investment companies are cheating the market.

Joining Sen. Cantwell at her proleteriat press conference? The President of the National Farmers Union and the President of the Industrial Energy Consumers of America.

3. Surprising number on the latest Survey USA poll: McGinn's approval rating is lowest among younger voters. 41 percent of 18-to 34-year-olds disapprove of the job he's doing (34 percent approve and 25 percent are unsure.) The age group that likes him best is 35-to-54-year-olds at 44 percent.

His highest approval rating comes from Liberals—46 percent approve.

Overall, the poll says he's at 40 percent approve, 34 percent disapprove, and 27 percent aren't sure. (Although, that adds up to 101 percent, so take all polls for what they're worth.)

4. And now, some first person Morning Fizz from our new BarNerd, David Meinert:

Seattle City Council Member Sally Clark has an interesting idea—close down a portion of E. Pike Street Thursday through Saturday nights making it pedestrian only. It's similar to what Austin does on on its famous 6th Avenue (and recently what New York City does on a stretch of Times Square.)

The concept isn't just about the war on cars, it's about creating a more social environment, giving people more space to mingle safely, and appreciate their city. It hasn't been totally vetted yet, but it seems like an idea that deserves discussion.

In fact, I like it, and I think it could be expanded to other parts of the City. I could definitely see Ballard Ave. being pedestrian on certain nights between NW Lone PL, about where Conor Byrne's is, and up to NW Market, just past the Sunset. There are several bars and live music venues in between, including Hattie's Hat, King's Hardware, and The Tractor. The idea is also possible along 1st Ave in Pioneer Square between Yesler and S. King St, home to the new J&M Cafe, The Central and The New Orleans.

I floated this idea by then-candidate Mike McGinn back in October, and he seemed to like it, saying he's proposed something similar in the past. (And he got PubliCola's endorsement at the time for talking about woonerfs—a Dutch word for spots like Pike Place Market where pedestrians and bicyclists share the street with motorists.)

Another one for the To Do list, Mayor McGinn.