Gubernatorial candidate Rob McKenna is running as a moderate Republican this year.

A fellow Republican could mess up the script. Elizabeth Scott, a Tea Party Republican and anti-gay activist who ran against openly-gay state Rep. Marko Liias (D-21, Edmonds) two years ago with McKenna's endoresement, is running again this year to  succeed 39th District Rep. Kirk Pearson, a Republican who is running to fill the seat being vacated by retiring state Sen. Val Stevens (R-39) this year.

AG McKenna praised Scott in 2010 her for her supporting policies tying teacher compensation, hiring, and firing to student performance (which matches his current campaign); her support for deregulation ("Elizabeth understands that running a business and making it successful takes a lot of hard work, and it's a lot harder when government interferes unnecessarily"); and her support for his lawsuit against President Obama's health care law ("I know I'll have her support in Olympia on that battle, even as other state legislators talk about cutting off funding for the lawsuit and try to stop the efforts that we're undertaking with our fellow states to battle the health care [law's] unconstitutional provisions.")

Randy Pepple, McKenna's spokesman, has not responded to a request to find out if the AG still supports Scott. (McKenna also endorsed hardline social conservative Steve O'Ban in his 2010 run for state house; O'Ban was the attorney for the religious pharmacists who challenged the state's pharmacy board rules directing pharmacies to fill emergency contraception prescriptions.)



Scott, a representative of the anti-gay rights group Focus on the Family, was one of the plaintiffs in the R-71 case, arguing that the names of those who signed petitions to ban gay marriage in Washington State should be kept private. (McKenna, of course, argued against the plaintiffs' claims, although he personally opposes marriage equality).

But she doesn't just oppose the rights of same-sex couples. She also hews to the state Republican Party platform on abortion, asserting on her Facebook page that there is an "unalienable right of human life from conception to natural death." (Science, and Democrats, disagree that clumps of cells are human beings, noting, for example, that between 10 and 15 percent of all pregnancies naturally result in miscarriage).