1. Isn't it Weird That ... Mayor Mike McGinn's rejoinder to the common accusation that he's divisive is that he's just standing up for causes that rattle the status quo, when McGinn's closest council ally, Mike O'Brien, has taken many of the exact same positions as McGinn (most notably on the tunnel—his staffer ran the the anti-tunnel campaign) yet everyone likes working with O'Brien?

In fact, he's one of the most well-liked city council members in Seattle.

Interpret the contradiction how you will. 

2. Isn't it Weird That ... the smoking gun in the McGinn campaign's successful ethics complaint against the Seattle Chamber of Commerce (the Chamber concealed a donation from Vulcan that was earmarked to help elect Ed Murray) was a mid-July directive from Vulcan exec Phil Fujii to use Vulcan's $15,000 to support Chamber choice Murray?

Fujii was McGinn's deputy mayor for the first year and a half of the McGinn administration before resigning, he said, for health reasons. 

Even weirder: Fujii himself donated $500 to McGinn in late May; $500 to Murray in mid July; and another $100 to McGinn in late July—two days before he sent the Vulcan check to support Murray.

3. Isn't it Weird That … The district elections campaign (Charter Amendment 19) purports to promote better representation of all people in Seattle, yet 85 percent of its funding ($233,073, as of yesterday) comes from a single North Seattle businesswoman and neighborhood activist, Faye Garneau?

Garneau has contributed such a high percentage of the campaign's funding that, under state law, she had to list herself as the sponsor of the campaign, which is now known as "Seattle Districts Now Sponsored by Faye Garneau."

Districts opponents argue that the current map, which creates seven new geographical council districts (plus two at-large seats) is weighted toward the North End and includes just one district, in Southeast Seattle, where minorities will make up a majority of voters; the six remaining districts will have white majorities. 

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