Isn't it weird that:

1. Isn't it weird that there's no woman on the likely list of mayoral candidates? Tim. Bruce. Ed. Mike. Peter. Ron.

2. Isn't it weird that it's never raining in James Corner's design summary for the Seattle Waterfront Committee?

3. Isn't it weird that gubernatorial candidate Rob McKenna hasn't formally spoken to the press since losing the race?

4. Isn't it weird that in his opening foray, Tim Burgess hyped his work fighting sex trafficking and the families and education levy? Mayor Mike McGinn led the charge on both.

Nearly 60 percent of all individual high income earners in the state live in King County—and no overlap here—nearly 60 percent of all high-earner families live in King County.

5. Isn't it weird that Seattle liberals are against the proposed levy swap to fund K-12 education because, they complain, it will fall disproportionately on Seattle. But Seattle liberals were wild about I-1098, the high earners' income tax?

1098 would have hit King County residents disproportionately. Nearly 60 percent of all individual high income earners in the state live in King County—and no overlap here—nearly 60 percent of all high-earner families live in King County.

Footnote on this: The conventional wisdom in Seattle against the swap is that red rural districts don't deserve our money because they voted against local levies in the first place. Wrong.

Out of 295 school districts in the state, only 15 haven't approved local levies; these are tiny districts, with all 15 combined having just 2,182 kids.

And besides, the levy swap would force those districts to pay up. Just like Seattle, they'd see a $1.17 per $1,000 increase. A couple of those districts would even put more in then they'd get back—the Orient District and the Shaw District, for example.