1. Mayoral candidate Ed Murray's campaign refused to participate in a campaign debate with his opponent, incumbent Mike McGinn, proposed by the Seattle Channel.

"We can't go to all of them," Murray tells Fizz. "The debates issue—I think that's bullshit."

(The Seattle Channel confirms that Murray didn't want to participate in their proposed debate, and will be appearing separately).

Murray's consultant, Sandeep Kaushik, elaborates: "The amount of time that’s required for a debate is a huge time commitment, and we're happy to do it for large-audience debates . ... But we have already agreed to a dozen debates and so, over the next two months, we’re reluctant to add more.

"The debates issue—I think that's bullshit."—Ed Murray"It’s the mayor’s strong suit. He's a trial litigator, so I’m sure he’d like to debate us twice a day until the election."

2. File this one under: I don't like bikes, but I like Mike. 

Mayor Mike McGinn announced at least two surprising supporters at his general election kickoff campaign yesterday: First, North Seattle Industrial Association president Eugene Wasserman, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit to prevent McGinn and the city from completing the so-called "Missing Link" of the Burke-Gilman bike and pedestrian trail through Ballard.

Wasserman does support McGinn's plan to accelerate funding for a new transit/bike/pedestrian bridge across the ship canal.

Another surprising McGinn backer who showed up at yesterday's press conference? Fremont Dock owner Suzie Burke, who was perhaps the most vocal opponent of the bike lane and sharrows on Stone Way

3. City council member Richard Conlin got unanimous council support yesterday for legislation that  earned a PubliCola Jolt last week (we made "crappy, suburban-style developments" the day's loser).

Conlin's legislation could keep low-density, parking-heavy buildings from going into dense neighborhoods in the futureConlin's bill, which will prevent some one-story, suburban-style developments in dense neighborhood commercial districts, comes in response to three single-story CVS pharmacies in Wallingford, Queen Anne, and West Seattle. 

The bill isn't likely to prevent any of those developments, but could keep low-density, parking-heavy buildings from going into dense neighborhoods in the future. 

4. King County Executive Dow Constantine gave his sole endorsement yesterday to Lynne Robinson, the Bellevue Parks Board member who's running against Vandana Slatter, the largely self-funded Amgen pharmacist, for the Bellevue City Council seat that will be vacated next year by Republican Don Davidson, who lost in the primary and endorsed Slatter.

Relying on five out-of-state food industry, chemical, and pharmaceutical companies, the No on 522 campaign has now raised $7.8 million.

The race marks a bit of a turning point for Bellevue—both candidates are young, Democratic women with strong progressive (and pro-transit) bona fides—Robinson has the backing of Seattle City Council members Tom Rasmussen and Sally Bagshaw, and Slatter is supported by both NARAL Pro-Choice Washington and Planned Parenthood Votes NW.

5. With an eye-popping $4 million donation to the anti-GMO labeling campaign this week, food engineering conglomerate Monsanto displaced the Grocery Manufacturers Association as the top contributor to No on 522; the Grocery Manufacturers have given about $2.2 million. 

Relying on five out-of-state food industry, chemical, and pharmaceutical companies, the No on 522 campaign has now raised $7.8 million.

The pro-GMO labeling side has raised about $3.3 million, mostly from small donors ($25 average from 5,000 donors), though their biggest backer is California-based Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps, which has kicked in nearly $1 million.  

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