1. Mayor Mike McGinn released his final TV ad this morning before next Tuesday's primary.

In a big change form his previous spots, McGinn stars in this one, looking in the camera, directly (and quietly) making his case.

His case is a bit strained, though. He spends the first 20 seconds making a veiled apology about his first year and a half in office. "I have to admit when I came into office four years ago, I wanted to change everything all at once ... and I've had to learn how to be mayor,"; then, saying the race is about substance, not style, he spends about 25 seconds listing his accomplishments—which, to be honest, are hard to trace to him.

He takes credit for creating jobs (no mention of what city programs he's talking about, his moribund green jobs investment, or the fact that the entire U.S. economy improved during his tenure); he takes credit for the "lowest crime rate in 30 years" and getting police out of their cars and onto the streets (McGinn did move some cops from patrol cars to bikes and foot patrols, but the biggest SPD news from his term, of course, is that the Seattle police are under a DOJ consent decree because of  excessive use of force and perceptions of racially biased policing; he takes credit for the families and education levy (a measure routinely passed by voters); he says he's building more mass transit (is he talking about a light rail study?) and fighting coal trains (yes, he's righteously against coal trains, but it's not clear what the accomplishment is).

It's a stylish ad—McGinn is a good speaker and the twinking background music and soft fades are super professional—but the substance is lacking.

2. Speaking of ad buys, the final fundraising totals and cash-on-hand reports are in. Ed Murray is way out in front of his rivals with $389,000 (having raised $87,000 in the last two weeks). McGinn raised the second most with $286,000 (only raising $19,000 in the last two weeks).

McGinn also appears to have left $8,000 on the table while Murray is $46,000 in the red.

Bruce Harrell raised $259,000 ($19,000 in the past two weeks) with $2,000 left.

Peter Steinbrueck's final numbers are not in.

3. On his Facebook page yesterday, mayoral candidate Peter Steinbreuck expressed disappointment with the news that the former PacMed building on Beacon Hill might become apartments instead of a health training a and nursing facility, saying "This is incredibly [short-]sighted and unfortunate!"

Steinbrueck, one of many who opposed the 1998 deal that resulted in a 99-year lease of the building to the development firm Wright Runstad (which subleased the building to Amazon; the retailer moved to South Lake Union just a decade later), tells Fizz the building has a long history as a public facility (before Amazon moved in, it was home to the publicly subsidized Pacific Medical Center) and should continue to benefit the public, not a private developer.

"This is a huge missed opportunity for the community college system," Steinbrueck says. "With all these issues that are swirling around—living-wage jobs, education—our community colleges are a critical component to advancing all of those goals.

Steinbrueck says he likes "the idea of housing" at the site, but adds that given the location (and its spectacular views), that housing will probably be "luxury apartments" and "the city needs far more than more luxury condos. We have plenty of those in towers in South Lake Union. We need affordable units for people who work in sea but can’t find affordable housing."

4. Speaking of Steinbrueck: The former council member will reportedly share the endorsement of the Seattle Medium, the Central District-based African American paper, with Mayor Mike McGinn—a knock on city council member Bruce Harrell, the only minority candidate in the race (he's half African American, half Japanese American) and the only candidate who grew up in the CD with campaign headquarters are at 23rd and Union just a few blocks from the Medium's 26th and Jackson offices.

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