1. Mayor Mike McGinn announced yesterday that he was lowering rates at Pacific Place garage, the money-losing downtown parking garage that's owned by the city---a somewhat odd move, given that, as we reported last year, rates at the garage were already considerably below the market rate for other nearby garages downtown.

Previously, it cost just $5 an hour to park at Pacific Place, compared to an average of $10 to $12 an hour at privately owned lots within three or four blocks. Under the new rates, parking will cost $3 an hour---less than on-street parking in the commercial core, which now costs $4 an hour---with additional discounts for people who park longer.

According to a city survey of parking rates, the average cost to park in a private lot downtown is $8.13 an hour.

2. Governing Magazine, the nerdy bible for state legislatures nationwide, has named two Washington state legislators as ones to watch in their list of ambitious new-ish legislators who show: leadership, an ability to work across party lines and challenge their own party, a record of legislative wins, and most important,  potential to win a higher office. [pullquote]Governing Magazine, the nerdy bible for state legislatures nationwide, has named two Washington legislators as ones to watch.[/pullquote]

They name Rep. Reuven Carlyle (D-36, Queen Anne) and Sen. Andy Hill (R-45, Redmond). (They tag 16 Republicans and 12 Democrats as "Legislators to Watch.")

They don't cite any big legislative wins for Carlyle (though he did head up this year's higher ed reform bill) nor for Hill, but we agree with both calls.

Carlyle is a rambunctious legislator who often frames the debate (he made a big deal out of challenging the two thirds requirement on this year's transportation funding bill) while also making a lot of noise about tax loopholes and the discrepancy between taxes paid (from his urban district) and service received (rural districts nudge Seattle out).

They're right on target about Hill too, noting "he's struck alliances with Democrats on certain environmental and education issues."

And they should add social issues. As we reported many times this session, Hill, joined by his fellow freshman Republicans from Seattle's Eastside suburbs, was a 'Yes' vote on things such as medical marijuana and the complete streets bills, challenging GOP orthodoxy.

3. Washington Votes has released a tally of how many votes each legislator missed during this year's session in Olympia.

Their quick facts:
Number of Bills Introduced in the Legislature: 2,093
Number of Bills Passed by the Legislature: 444
Number of Roll Call votes in the Senate: 648
Number of Roll Call votes in the House: 714
Number of legislators who didn’t miss any of these votes: 51
Number of legislators who missed more than 100 votes: 3

Who were the three delinquents? Sen. Jerome Delvin (R-8, Richland); Rep. Larry Crouse (R-4, Spokane Valley), and Rep. Jay Rodne (R-5, N. Bend).