Retirement Living
The chimps in your story " Why Is This Chimp Smiling? " (December 2009) led such miserable lives. Now six females and one male, all of whom have endured hellish experiences, are safe in the hands of wonderful people. Keith LaChappelle’s vision never wavered, even before any chimps arrived. These are not the cutie chimps you see on TV commercials but battle-scarred veterans. May their retirement be full of joy!
Shirley McGreal,
Chairwoman, International Primate Protection League
Summerville, South Carolina
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Friend of Foxie
Last Christmas, I saw a short video on a local news website of the chimps in your story " “Why Is This Chimp Smiling?" (December 2009) experiencing snow for the first time. As a Christmas present to myself, I signed up to be a sponsor of Foxie—the chimp who always carries a troll doll. My year has been so enriched by daily checking the chimpsanctuarynw.org blog for videos and photos of the Cle Elum Seven. I am amused and honored and humbled and educated by watching their daily antics.

My life is enriched by supporting these chimps. I have come to “know” them and love each one individually—all through the Internet. The caretakers are brilliant and loving. They update the supporters via blog posts, photos, and videos of our chimp friends. It is the most fun I have ever had donating to charity.

Great job on this article. I was so pleased to see it.
Kat Morrell
Kirkland
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Great Apes
What a thrill it was to read the article on the Cle Elum Seven “Why Is This Chimp Smiling?" (December 2009). So few people know the plight of these great apes in our culture. Your article was insightful, meaningful, and thorough while allowing readers to stomach the reality of these amazing animals in research and entertainment. Thank you for including this important piece. I have a new respect for Seattle Metropolitan.
Christine Wilford, DVM
Bellevue

Scooters (Should) Rule
Great article " Beat the Traffic: Great Racers " (November 2009), but the scooter guy turned in a really pathetic performance. Everyone else took I-90, so why did this guy make the boneheaded choice to go up Lake Sammamish to Highway 520? If his scooter was fast enough to get him to the starting point via I-90, why not take that route back to Seattle? If he had, he could’ve used the same HOV lane as your carpoolers, and probably won the derby. As it was, he barely beat the cyclist (who stopped a few times for sightseeing!). That is so many flavors of sad, it’s not funny.

Motorcycles and scooters are efficient and fun alternatives to the “cager” grind, and they can seriously reduce parking congestion downtown as well. Too bad you couldn’t have found someone with a little more “street savvy” and common sense.
A(n Anonymous) Road Warrior
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Faux Seattle
Nice article " 75 Years of Seattle Movies ". I have worked in the movie industry in the Northwest since 1983 and long for the good old days of one or two Hollywood-produced movies a year coming to Seattle. Unfortunately those days are long gone, most of the “Seattle” movies are made in Vancouver and at best come “down” here for only a few days just to rip off enough shots to make the movie seem like it is in Seattle. After falling way behind other states with tax breaks for productions in Washington, the tide may be turning, however when combined with a declining crew base and lack of infrastructure, not to mention the traffic congestion, it may never come back. It is a shame most of my work has been out of state where quite frankly moviemaking is embraced as the job-creating, clean industry that it is. But thank you for not mentioning those Seattle rip-off movies so many others do.
Raymond Brown
Freeland, Washington
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Missed Flicks
I enjoyed the info in “75 Years of Seattle Movies” (December 2009), however, you neglected Harry and the Hendersons, The Black Widow (a movie about Jacqueline Kennedy that was partially shot here with Jaclyn Smith because certain parts of our city would reflect the Boston area), Firewall with Harrison Ford and Virginia Madsen, Face of a Stranger with Gena Rowlands and Tyne Daly, and Third Degree Burn with Treat Williams and Virginia Madsen.
Gary Cluff
Belltown

 

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