Dr. Donna J. Quinby, of the Eastside Pediatric Dental Group, has a few words for kids (and grown-ups) who like to eat and drink—that is, all of us. “No one food or drink and no single exposure of that food or drink is responsible for the formation of a cavity. The balance between the foods and drinks we consume and our oral hygiene efforts are like the waves of the ocean. The waves come in and the waves go out, bringing with them sand and various items onto the shore and then taking them away. As we go throughout our day, minerals will exit and reenter our teeth. If we can keep that in balance, teeth can remain cavity free.” In other words, remember to brush. 

 

 

 

 

Professional Opinion

Dr. Donald C. Ausink (Federal Way): “The top two things we tell our patients to avoid are energy drinks and sodas. The sugars and acids present in these drinks are incredibly damaging to the teeth, especially if they are drunk throughout the day.”

Local Favorites

• Golazo All Natural Energy Drink

• Jones Soda Co. Blue 
Bubblegum Soda

Dr. Nicole M. Leiker (West Edge Dental, Seattle): “I rarely discourage people from drinking coffee, tea, and red wine. This is Seattle after all—we need something to help us get through winter. However, these things all stain teeth and make them look dingy and aged.”

• Starbucks Dark Roast Sumatra

• Vital Tea Leaf Lychee Black Tea

• Chateau Ste. Michelle Indian Wells Merlot

Dr. Susan Kim (Factoria Pediatric Dentistry, Bellevue): “Added sugars in refined foods such as cakes and pastries assist plaque to develop and accumulate on teeth.”

• Simply Desserts Chocolate Fudge Cake

• Bakery Nouveau Sugar Brioche

Dr. Nikole R. O’Bryan (Seattle): “If you’re prone to pulling fillings out or get cavities often, make caramels a special treat.”

• Fran’s Salted Caramels

  

 

Published: January 2013