satay

Patrick McCredie and Peter Ringold plan to open Satay in Wallingford this week. Photo courtesy the restaurant.

Patrick McCredie and Peter Ringold, the college buddies opening Satay in Wallingford, led their first production run Tuesday morning and “things went smoothly,” an ebullient McCredie told me shortly thereafter. As such, their Malaysian-inspired restaurant should open Thursday or Friday of this week, says McCredie.

Word surfaced several months ago that the first-time restaurateurs were taking over 1711 North 45 Street in Wallingford, once home to the short-lived Avila. McCredie moved here from California in January 2010, then he and Ringold, a Phinney Ridge native, spent about nine months looking for a spot to launch their virgin venture. Five potential sites fell through before “the stars just kind of aligned” and they were signing the dotted line.

Not long before McCredie’s move the duo traveled throughout Southeast Asia together, where they were taken with the the thriving street food scene. And, especially, the way in which vendors honed just one or two items “and did it really well.” McCredie and Ringold have sculpted their menu with that philosophy in mind—though it runs 10 items deep (all of them under $10), McCredie says they’ve perfected each one.

No hostess, no wait staff, Satay is the sort of casual place where you can pop in quickly without sacrificing quality, says McCredie. Ringold’s aunt is Malay and tutored the two in Malaysian cuisine.

Not surprisingly, satay—chicken, beef, lamb, or tofu—makes up the bulk of the offerings and is paired with jasmine rice and salad with chili pepper dressing. Two kinds of roti—one savory with red curry dipping sauce, the other a dessert variety topped with condensed milk and cinnamon—along with laksa, a noodle-y mee goreng, and curry puffs round out the fare. The latter, similar to samosas, are among McCredie’s favorites from the menu.

Hours are currently set for Monday-Saturday 11:30am-9pm.