Eye contact and a good pitch should suffice. Troop Beverly Hills photo via IMDB.

When Molly Moon Neitzel was a girl scout, she honed her cookie-selling spiel in the family living room, with her mom on hand to remind her to enunciate and speak up. All that practice in enunciating and speaking to grownups came in handy when Moon became one herself and opened her eponymous flock of ice cream shops in Seattle. And one of her signature flavors is made with the same Thin Mint cookies that she and her successors in scouthood sell every year. 

Now Molly Moon’s is preparing to make another massive cookie purchase in preparation for new batches of Scout Mint. And she does this by letting enterprising girl scouts stop in and make a compelling sales pitch. This process has become an annual tradition of sorts; last year it didn’t happen because the $21,000 buy from 2011 was still going strong.

On Friday after 3pm, Neitzel will be hanging out in her Capitol Hill shop, and her managers at the Wallingford and Queen Anne locations will also be ready to shell out for around 84,000 cookies. While Moon doesn’t expect any Troop Beverly Hills-style song and dance numbers, she does believe that selling cookies helps girls develop valuable life skills (and proceeds help them go to camp in the summer). 

“These girls who are 7- and 8- and 9-years-old come in and can look an adult in the eye and make a pitch and not be too shy or too nervous and too goofy,” says Moon. Developing such skills is “kind of the start of you being a grownup.”

Fun side note: The new Molly Moon's social media dude is none other than Cole Deleon Jones from Brothers From Another, aka the guys who rap about Molly Moon. So I guess song and dance numbers are a useful sales tool after all?