Image: Joe Mabel
The Bullitt Center was built to be the greenest building in the world.

The ideals of Earth Day are alive and well in the Pacific Northwest. With community gardens and sustainable architecture, a compost bin in the yard of every home, Seattleites are no strangers to the green movement. So this week let’s remember to always strive for greenness—and to save some green while we’re at it.

Monday, April 21
Barbara Ehrenreich
A New York Times bestselling author, Barbara Ehrenreich has been called a “veteran muckraker” and calls herself a “myth buster by trade.” Perhaps best known for her book Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, she is a noted social and political critic and has written over 20 books.  She comes to Town Hall to discuss her new book, Living with a Wild God: A Nonbelievers Search for the Truth about Everything, a story of her youthful quest for knowledge and the definition of spirituality. Town Hall, $5.

Tuesday, April 22
Bullitt Center
This Earth Day the Bullitt Center is opening its doors to the public. Located in the Central District, the Bullitt Center was designed to be the greenest commercial building in the world upon its completion in 2012. The tour showcases the many green features of the building, including the gray water and rainwater treatment systems, no-flush toilets, and its irresistible sunlit staircase. How very Pacific Northwest, no? Bullitt Center, free.

Thursday, April 24
CollegeHumor Live
Jake Hurwitz and Amir Blumenfeld are the masterminds behind CollegeHumor's longest-running, Webby Award-winning—and aptly titled—series, Jake and Amir. Joined by Streeter Seidell, a stand-up comic, writer, and editor of CollegeHumor, the Internet-all-star crew moves its show from the computer screen to the stage for a night of endless giggles.  You’ll laugh till you laugh till you laugh. The Vera Project, $10.

Friday-Sunday, April 25-27
Cherry Blossom and Japanese Cultural Festival
The Seattle Cherry Blossom and Japenese Cultural Festival was founded 39 years ago to commemorate the 1,000 cherry blossom trees given to Seattle by prime minister Takeo Miki on behalf of Japan’s government. A feast for the senses, this year’s festival features Taiko drumming, artisan demonstrations, and a theatrical production of the first Japanese shipwreck on Washington soil. For Japanophiles, Sakura-con goers, and all those in-between, the festival is an opportunity to experience one of the many cultures that makes our city so diverse—and what Seattleite isn’t thankful for those cherry blossoms? The Seattle Center, free.

Saturday, April 26
Northwest Green Home Tour
If your hunger for sustainable architecture isn’t satiated by the Bullitt Center, the Northwest Green Home Tour should be at the top of your list. Including sustainable and green new homes, remodels, and energy retrofits, the tour showcases 35 sites and 12 sustainability stops throughout the greater Seattle area. It is entirely self-guided and gives viewers the opportunity to learn about sustainable building practices. Biking, carpooling, or walking between sites is encouraged, of course. Various locations, free.