Framing changes everything. 

Exhibit A: This story from KIRO News, which reports on a proposal by the city council to pass a new bike master plan and, in KIRO's words, "take away parking for bike lanes." 

The story assumes the reader is a car driver. Literally: The lead begins, "Your drive through Seattle could become a lot more congested and your chances of finding street parking could evaporate as the city installs a series of protected lanes to accommodate bike commuters."

Because you aren't a "bike commuter." You're a normal person. A driver. On "your drive through Seattle." Bike commuters? Not people, or real commuters, apparently. 

Additionally, according to KIRO, "some [anonymous, unidentified, and unquoted] people ask why the city is spending $20 million a year for such a small segment of the community." 

Because you aren't a "bike commuter." You're a normal person. A driver. On "your drive through Seattle." Bike commuters? Not people, or real commuters, apparently. 

Exhibit B (and sorry to pick on TV news here, but whoa): KOMO reports that "big, multi-story homes" are invading the city's single-family neighborhoods, and need to be stopped. 

New rules are being drafted to prevent three-story homes from being squeezed onto small lots but still allow for new development in established neighborhoods," KOMO reports. 

How big are these homes that are "being squeezed onto small lots"? All of 30 feet high. That's two and a half stories—hardly the "towering" monoliths the story describes, as the photo accompanying the story, which shows a supposed "big home" that barely rises above the height of the traditional two-story Craftsman next door, makes abundantly clear. 

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