For Today

Image via addictionincorporated.com

Addiction, Incorporated

A scientist for Philip Morris in the 1970s and 80s—hired, supposedly, to research options for making cigarettes safer—Victor DeNoble's research discovered that nicotine was definitely addictive. DeNoble was eventually kept from publishing in medical journals, fired, and forced to sign a nondisclosure agreement regarding his discoveries.

Since 1994, however, DeNoble has been a key expert in trials against tobacco companies, and has become one of the most active and vocal anti-smoking activists in the country. This documentary tells the story of DeNoble, often called the first whistleblower on the tobacco industry.

Addiction, Incorporated, Thu, Apr 10, 5:30pm, Thomson Hall Room 101, UW Seattle, free (RSVP encouraged).

For Friday

Little City Hall in West Seattle

"Getting to City Hall downtown can be pretty inconvenient for West Seattleites, so I thought I should bring City Hall to you," said Seattle City Council member Tom Rasmussen.

Council member Rasmussen is holding "little city halls" in West Seattle and South Park to chat with those farther-out citizens. Anyone can come by during the set hours to chat with Rasmussen to talk about any issues—minimum wage, gender pay equity, parks funding. And if you miss this one, there's another on April 23.

West Seattle Little City Hall, Fri, Apr 11, 9–11am, West Seattle Senior Center Cafe, 4217 SW Oregon St, free.

Youth Speaks Seattle Grand Slam

On Friday night 12 finalists will perform their original spoken-word poetry, competing to be one of five poets chosen to represent Seattle at the 2014 International Brave New Voices Festival. Hollis Wong-Wear, the Grammy-nominated Macklemore collaborator, is hosting the competition.

The evening's 12 performers are all teens that hone their craft with Youth Speaks Seattle, an organization providing Seattle youth with open-mic nights, slams, and writing workshops.

Even the host got her start with YSS.

Youth Speaks Seattle Grand Slam, Fri, Apr 11, 7:30–10:30pm, Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave, $20.

For Saturday

Minimum Wage Town Hall

Skeptical that app-y, trendy, tech-y projects can actually translate into real solutions for systemic problems such as homelessness? Me too, but here's an opportunity to check out some of these projects in the development phases.

From our Advance Notice files: The Select Committee on Minimum Wage and Income Inequality is hosting a town hall meeting to discuss raising the minimum wage. If you aren't all talked out about this yet, you might want to spend your Saturday speaking to council members and fellow Seattleites about the benefits of raising minimum wage.

You can arrive early (9 am) for coffee and conversation with council members, and at 10 the presentations will begin. Marieka M. Klawitter and Robert D. Plotnick of the UW Evans School of Public Affairs and Ken Jacobs of UC Berkeley's Institute for Research on Labor and Employment will offer up their analysis of increasing wages.

Minimum Wage Town Hall, Sat, Apr 12, 10am, Northgate Community Center, 10510 Fifth Ave NE, free.

Advance Notice for May 1–4

Hack to End Homelessness

Skeptical that app-y, trendy, tech-y projects can actually translate into real solutions for systemic problems such as homelessness? Me too, but here's an opportunity to check out some of these projects in the development phases.

Technologists, nonprofits, and community members are coming together to find solutions for ending homelessness. Sponsored by Real Change, the YWCA, Youth Care, and many more local organizations, the weekend's events begin with Pioneer Square's First Thursday Art Walk and a Friday screening of @home, a documentary exploring homelessness with activist Mark Horvath.

The real work, however, will happen on Saturday and Sunday, when participants will collaborate on projects—such as building a social network for homeless people that works on low-end phones and SMS, or setting up an e-commerce site to support artwork with homeless youth—intended to improve the lives of the homeless. (You can review a preliminary proposal list for the weekend's projects, which will be updated as more proposals come in.)

On Sunday evening, participants will make their open-to-the-public pitches.

Hack to End Homelessness, May 1–4, Impact Hub Seattle, 220 Second Ave S, $100 for full weekend (tickets for individual events also available).

Want to see your nerdy event featured on the PubliCalendar?
Send the details to Genie Leslie at publicalendar@seattlemet.com.
 

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