1. You should check out our news coverage of yesterday's Washington State Supreme Court hearing, but for some caffeinated prognosticating, stick with Fizz. 

First of all, we don't know if the Court is going to hold the legislature in contempt and smack them with one of their threatened remedies such as going with the illogical GOP fix to  make the state fund education before funding any other part of the budget (you can't expect kids to succeed inside the classroom when social services outside the classroom get gutted), but judging from exchanges like this, the state should be nervous.

Explaining that the Court shouldn't take swift action to force the legislature's hand on school funding, state counsel Alan Copsey told the justices that the Court, without a funding outline, doesn't know yet how to measure funding progress.

Suddenly he got interrupted by an exasperated Chief Justice Barbara Madsen, who untangled his Catch-22 defense with this:

Chief Justice Madsen getting mad

"Counsel, wasn't that the whole point of what we were asking the legislature? To provide us with its time-line and its benchmarks? I mean, we don't know, you're right. That's why we asked the legislature to do that for us. And we don't have that."   

 2. There will be a memorial service for Bob Gogerty, the local political consultant who died last month, this Friday at Town Hall at 2:00 p.m. in the Great Hall. 

Known for big civic campaigns like working to pass light rail and funding for the Seahawks stadium, Josh remembers having a blast sparring with him on the phone during Gogerty's work for one of his corporate clients, AT&T

The one real green urbanist on the council, Mike O'Brien, is now scared shitless about the opposition to microhousing.

3. It's not officially time for our Friday LIKES & DISLIKES yet, but we've heard enough to know that we're starting to DISLIKE the new districting scheme for city council elections.

Why?

Because the one real green urbanist on the council, Mike O'Brien, is now scared shitless about the opposition to microhousing in Ballard (the heart of his new District 6), and is proposing legislation to appease NIMBY voters that would, by raising square footage requirements, skewer the city-centric option. His proposal would decrease the number of potential units and increase their cost to renters from an average of $850, according to developers, to an average of $1250.

 

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