The ten new parklet locations in map form
The ten new parklet locations in map form

 After a successful trial outside Montana on Capitol Hill, the city has designated 10 new locales to join Seattle's fledgling parklet population—a pilot program where businesses pay to convert nearby curbside parking spaces into tiny public parks.

Apparently people enjoyed Montana's union between parklet, food, and drink so much that seven of the additions to the program are being funded by bars, restaurants, or ice cream shops. 

Soni Davé-Schock, who owns Madrona wine bar Bottlehouse with her husband Henri, hopes the parklet destined for their stretch of 34th Street will inspire a “stoop culture for people to catch up, drink coffee, eat ice cream, and gather.” Even though there's a larger park down the street, she says the new addition will enhance the neighborhood’s dining and imbibing experience “by engaging the streetscape” in a new way (no, you can't drink wine there). The Schocks partnered with neighboring restaurant Hi-Spot for the application, with a bit of collaboration from fellow neighbor Molly Moon's. 

Similarly, Hillman City Community Coordinator Karen Haight is excited by the prospective changes her neighborhood's parklet—the only one south of I-90—might bring to the neighborhood. Tin Umbrella Coffee Roasters sponsored the application; Haight and Tin Umbrella owner Joya Iverson are working with neighbors and community members to rally the funding and human power necessary to complete the project. “It could be a virtuous cycle,” Haight says.  “if more people want to come and spend time in our neighborhood, we may be able to attract more businesses to fill the remaining storefronts.” New restaurants? Maybe. At the very least Hillman City will have an excellent spot to drink coffee in Seattle’s summer sun.

The other parklets with food ties will be located outside Ballard’s Delancey pizzeria, the Wallingford Molly Moon’s, Cortona Cafe in the Central District, Urban Visions at The Chomer Building (the Second Avenue structure downtown that will soon to be home to Elysian Brewery and Cherry Street Coffee), and Lost Lake Lounge in Capitol Hill. Here's the full list of new parklet locations. How long until parking spots become the city’s most difficult tables to reserve?

 

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